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Is Yoga A Sport?

Is Yoga A Sport
Yoga Sport competitions have been held for many years. Competitive yoga involves the performance of yoga positions (asanas) in sporting competitions. But is it a sport? Competitive yoga is controversial, as it goes against the principles yoga, that being an individual thing, aiming for being internally at peace and not competing against others. yoga sport Generally, yoga competitions involve participants performing six poses in three minutes. The Athlete chooses one posture from each of the six compulsory posture groups (Backbends, Forward Compressions, Tractions, Twists, Lifts and Inversions), demonstrating the basic range of motion of the spine and the skills of the athlete.

Is yoga included as sport?

Is Yoga A Sport For thousands of years people have been turning to yoga as a way to stretch, release tensions and stress, engage in physical activity, and be one with their minds. The physically challenging aspects and high-skill level techniques that go into yoga have left many people unsure whether or not it should be considered a sport.

  • A sport is generally defined as a physical activity that includes a competitive component.
  • While yoga fits into this description, it lacks the competitive nature of athletics such as swimming and tennis, which is what disqualifies it for the title of “sport.” Yoga, like football, requires an incredible amount of strength and skill.

The difference between the two is that yoga involves a spiritual and philosophical aspect that most sports do not. Yoga is made up of different branches: karma, mantra, bhakti, gyana, raja and hatha. The final branch is the only one that involves physical movements; so, while the workout is a component, the most important part of the practice is to be in tune with your breath, body and especially your mind.

  • More conventional sports typically place the body before the mind, however, yoga does the opposite.
  • Seeing as its emphasis is on the spiritual aspect, competing against others in yoga defeats its purpose.
  • You should be focused on yourself and becoming preoccupied with what others are doing goes against the activity’s aim.

“To me, yoga should not be about competition, but I don’t have anything against people wanting to compete. It is athletically challenging but I personally wouldn’t chose to practice yoga for competition. Yoga doesn’t come without the spiritual side for me and while many people may get into it for the physical I’ve found that they stay for the spiritual,” AP Environmental Science teacher Virginia Ansaldi said.

  • Those who are pushing for the adoption of yoga as an official sport will argue that it fits into the definition perfectly.
  • Unbeknownst to most, thousands of people around the US compete in athletic events as part of a Yoga Asana team.
  • The competitions are similar to dance and gymnastics.
  • The competitor performs a routine which involves a series of poses and a judge then gives them a score based on this performance.

A common phrase to hear from instructors is to not let yourself compare your practice to that of others, therefore competing against others detracts from the spirituality of yoga. https://www.cavsconnect.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/Blah-Blah-2-1.m4a While the physical element is unarguably there, the very essence and original purpose of yoga is being nullified when the competitive aspect is introduced.

  1. To consider this a sport would be to go against its teachings, something that completely alters its fundamental ideals.
  2. Yoga should be recognized as a physically and mentally challenging activity, but calling it a sport may be going too far.
  3. Rather than focusing on winning, those who practice yoga should focus on bettering themselves and their body through their practice.

A popular mantra that perfectly encompasses the essence of yoga is “Yoga is the journey of the Self, through the Self, to the Self.” Competing against others goes against this, thereby going against the very nature of yoga. Ultimately, its the spirituality and focus on oneself that make up its core, not the exercise.

Is yoga a sport or meditation?

How It Works – Workout fads come and go, but virtually no other exercise program is as enduring as yoga, It’s been around for more than 5,000 years. Yoga does more than burn calories and tone muscles. It’s a total mind-body workout that combines strengthening and stretching poses with deep breathing and meditation or relaxation.

Hatha. The form most often associated with yoga, it combines a series of basic movements with breathing. Vinyasa. A series of poses that flow smoothly into one another. Power. A faster, higher-intensity practice that builds muscle. Ashtanga. A series of poses, combined with a special breathing technique. Bikram. Also known as “hot yoga,” it’s a series of 26 challenging poses performed in a room heated to a high temperature. Iyengar. A type of yoga that uses props like blocks, straps, and chairs to help you move your body into the proper alignment.

Why is yoga a good sport?

Yoga helps to promote mental and physical relaxation, but that’s not the only benefit it provides. In fact, yoga can be a beneficial component of any cross-training routine for athletes, and it can enhance performance in other sports as well. Research has suggested that yoga improves flexibility, balance, coordination, and lung function.

It can also help athletes effectively manage stress, an often forgotten but key contributor to recovery and performance. Yoga has a reputation for being slow. Which, in part, is true. However, there are many types of yoga, from the slower-paced yin yoga, or restorative yoga, to a fast-paced calorie burner like power yoga, vinyasa, or Bikram hot yoga,

On the slower end, you’ll be working on balance by holding poses for longer and connecting deeply to your breath. It may seem easy from the outside, but when you’re holding a one-legged utthita hasta padangusthasana (extended hand-to-big-toe pose) for 10 breaths, your body will be shaking as your hip flexors open and your glutes activate to keep you upright.

  1. These types of yoga build core strength, which is invaluable to any sport.
  2. A faster yoga flow builds stamina and endurance, a great way to improve cardiovascular fitness.
  3. You fluidly work through movements that focus on lengthening the muscles and alleviating toughness or restriction at the tendon or joint.

For this reason, many consider yoga essential to their training and it’s accessible even to yoga newbies, Yoga’s ability to help with balance and core strength, while also building stamina and endurance is, in part, why most well-rounded athletes incorporate a yoga session or two into their training — on and off-season.

What is the difference between yoga & sports?

Yoga is a group of physical, mental, and spiritual activities. Sports are a group of physical activities. Yoga makes the body flexible. Sports make the body rigid and develop muscles of the body.

What type of sport is yoga?

Yoga Sport competitions have been held for many years. Competitive yoga involves the performance of yoga positions (asanas) in sporting competitions. But is it a sport? Competitive yoga is controversial, as it goes against the principles yoga, that being an individual thing, aiming for being internally at peace and not competing against others. yoga sport Generally, yoga competitions involve participants performing six poses in three minutes. The Athlete chooses one posture from each of the six compulsory posture groups (Backbends, Forward Compressions, Tractions, Twists, Lifts and Inversions), demonstrating the basic range of motion of the spine and the skills of the athlete.

What category does yoga fall under?

Yoga Industry Statistics FAQ –

  1. How much is the yoga industry worth? The yoga industry is worth $37.46 billion. This was the value of the global yoga industry in 2019, and this number is expected to reach $66.23 billion by 2027. The yoga industry’s value is fueled by more than 300 million people who do yoga around the world. In the U.S., the yoga industry earns over $9 billion in revenue each year, and the yoga and pilates studio industry alone was valued at $12.82 billion in 2020. All of this is made possible because of the over 36 million Americans who do yoga, and the average amount they spend on yoga classes, workshops, and equipment over their lifetimes is $62,640.
  2. Is the yoga industry growing? Yes, the yoga industry is growing. Globally, the yoga industry is expected to see a CAGR of 9.6% from 2021 to 2017, resulting in an industry value of $66.23 billion by 2027. During this period of time, the Asia-Pacific market is anticipated to see the largest amount of growth at a CAGR of 10.8%. In the U.S., the number of yoga and pilates studios has increased at a 4.6% average annual growth rate from 2017 to 2022, which has resulted in a total of 48,547 yoga and pilates studios as of 2022. The number of Americans practicing yoga has also been on a steady increase as well, growing from 9.5% of adults doing yoga in 2012 to 14.3% in 2017. The number of kids doing yoga has also grown, moving from 3.1% to 8.4% from 2012 to 2017.
  3. Is yoga a profitable business? Yes, yoga is a profitable business. Starting a studio, for example, is usually profitable (as long as you have customers) since you don’t need as much capital to operate as you do in other industries. Instead, on the most basic level, you’ll just need to pay rent, pay for your supplies, and show up. As far as yoga supplies and clothing go, this is also a profitable business, as yogis are often big spenders: The average American yoga practitioner will spend over $60,000 during their lifetime on yoga classes, equipment, and workshops. In addition, online yoga classes are quickly growing in popularity, which can often mean lower overhead costs for many yoga instructors, increasing their profit margins.
  4. What industry does yoga fall under? Yoga falls under the fitness, health, and wellness industry. Some people will put it under the mental health industry; however, as many people practice it as a way to combat depression, anxiety, and other mental health concerns.54% of yoga practitioners said they took up yoga to help them release tension, 52% say they do it to improve both physical and mental strength, and 43% say they practice yoga to boost their happiness levels.27% also said they do it to get more “me” time, 21% do it to feel less lonely, and 20% do it as a way to take a break from electronics. All of these reasons for taking up yoga could fall under either the mental health or wellness industry categories, which is why there is some debate over which one it falls under. However, the majority of the time, it falls under the fitness, health, and wellness industry because a significant number of people use yoga to benefit their bodies, even if boosting their mental health comes alongside that. This is seen in the 61% of people who say they use yoga in some capacity to help improve their mobility and flexibility and in a significant number of people who use it to treat lower back and other chronic pain.
  5. In which country is yoga most popular? Yoga is most popular in Canada. According to Google search trends, Canada has the highest number of people interested in yoga. Singapore comes next, then Australia, Ireland, the U.S., and India. North America has the largest share of the global yoga industry, but the Asia-Pacific market is expected to see the most growth from 2021 to 2027, with an estimated CAGR of 10.8%.
  6. How big is the online yoga market? The online yoga market makes up 67% of the total number of people who do yoga. In other words, 67% of people who practice yoga do it at home, followed by 43% who do it at the gym. The online yoga market is expected to see a significant amount of growth from 2021 to 2017, increasing at a CAGR of 12.3% during this time period. This growth was spurred by the COVID-19 pandemic when lockdowns forced people to do workouts in their own homes instead of at gyms or yoga studios. This shift in demand resulted in an increase in online yoga classes, and this growth isn’t expected to stop anytime soon.

Is 20 minutes of yoga a day enough?

You don’t need to do yoga for hours and hours to reap benefits. Even a 20-minute session can help you burn calories and enhance your well-being.

Is 30 minutes of yoga a day enough?

My recommendation, based on the people that I’ve worked with in person and the thousands of people that I’ve trained through my online programs – is the following: – If yoga is NOT your only workout, complete at least 2-3 yoga sessions per week for a minimum of 60-100 minutes of yoga per week.

The yoga you do should focus on aspects of fitness NOT covered in your other workouts, typically including: mobility, flexibility, balance, breathing, restorative stretching, and body awareness. If yoga is your only workout, aim for at least 20-30 minutes of yoga, 6 days per week. If necessary, you can start with 3 days per week for your first month.

As your fitness level increases, you can increase that to 40-70 minutes per day. (Be sure to also include essential exercises NOT included in yoga, such as pulling or rowing exercises, overhead press, and grip strength – I’ll go into deeper detail about this subject in the “If Yoga Is Your Only Workout” section below.) There are more considerations than these, but without going into too much detail to address the millions of individual fitness situations, these are the most important to keep in mind.

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Can you get fit from yoga?

Can yoga improve muscle strength – Yes, yoga is a good way to build muscle tone and strength. By regularly doing yoga, you can build muscle, improve your flexibility, improve your posture, and help you maintain a healthy weight. Poses like Downward-Facing Dog and the Warrior poses work to increase strength in just about every muscle in your body.

Why yoga is better than gym?

Find out which one works better for you. Confused what to choose — yoga or gym? Each has its own benefits and we cannot really say one is better than the other. Fitness and lifestyle professional, Nawaz Modi Singhania, says, “Different schools of yoga yield different fitness and health benefits.

On the fitness front, by and large, with yoga one can expect increased flexibility, toning, strengthening to a certain degree, meditation and breathing exercises.” Yoga trainer, Yogesh Chavhan says, “A gym session can make you feel tired and hungry while yoga revitalises you and helps in digestion.” Nawaz states that while yoga has its distinct pluses, barring the odd exceptions (e.g.

power yoga), yoga does not provide the cardiovascular benefits, which are so vitally important to all human beings. She adds, “Fat loss and weight loss is not achieved through yoga, this is derived through cardio activities. Cardio activities could include aerobics, walking, jogging, cycling, rope skipping, dancing and swimming.” The Killer Combo Nawaz says, “For ideal results it is best to combine three to four days of cardio with two to three days of yoga, each week.

The two can complement each other nicely. Space out your workout days. Keep one day a week for resting. Watch your diet and lifestyle to derive the best results.” YOGA -With yoga one can expect increased flexibility, toning and strengthening. -You don’t need any equipment, just some space around yourself to practice the various asanas.

You save the travel time needed to go to a gym. -You don’t feel the urge to bunk yoga sessions because of the convenience it offers. -After a yoga session one feels energetic and fresh. It helps to get rid of fatigue. -Yoga does not increase hunger. -The ancient science of yoga has been developed in such a way that it acts on the internal organs of the body and benefits one not just physically, but mentally, intellectually and spiritually also, says holistic health guru Mickey Mehta.

  • GYM -You need equipment for gymming and also you cannot do it at home.
  • Not everyone can afford a gym at home.
  • Your gym could be far from home and you might end up using precious time reaching there.
  • There are times when one tends to bunk gym sessions because of distance, weather, etc.
  • After a gym work out one may feel tired and having to deal with sore body parts.

-A gym session may increase your hunger and lead to overeating. -Gym sessions act more or less on the outer appearance and tone the muscles. -A gym workout mostly has only physical benefits and rarely offers mental stimulation.

What happens if you do yoga everyday?

The benefits of doing yoga everyday – We will not transform our practice—nor, in turn, our practice transform our lives—if we do not practice regularly. The more we practice, the deeper we delve into our potential, our true selves. What happens if you practice yoga every day? A daily practice empowers us with the spiritual confidence gained from progressing through the asanas and breaking through mental, physical, and emotional obstacles.

  • A daily practice cultivates the attitude that through patience and compassion, not brute strength, we can accomplish just about anything on and off our mats.
  • A daily yoga practice has many great benefits ! It helps keep us grounded, centered, balanced, flexible, strong, calm, clear-headed, focused, relaxed, happy, healthy, and free from stress and anxiety.

In other words, it keeps us sane!

Can you do too much yoga?

What Are the Risks of Doing Too Much Yoga? – Because there is a physical aspect of yoga, it can be overdone and lead to more serious injuries, just like any other form of physical activity, says Bell. “I have had people I know tear their hamstring tendons doing fast vinyasa flow practices and develop some chronic ongoing pain in that area.

There are reports of neck injuries from the practice of full inverted poses, such as headstand and shoulder stand,” he says. According to a survey of 1,336 yoga teachers published in the International Journal of Yoga Therapy, excess effort is one of the most common causes of injury during yoga. The instructors reported that the most common injuries involved the neck, lower back, knee, shoulder, and wrist.

Another study, published in November 2016 in the Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, examined yoga injuries that sent people to the doctor between 2001 and 2014, and found that sprains and strains to the chest, back, the shoulders, and the abdomen were the most common (and the cause of 46.6 percent of yoga injuries).

Doing too much of just one style of yoga can worsen existing injuries or cause a new one, says Krucoff. Overdoing hot yoga — which is typically practiced in rooms that are between 90 and 105 degrees — may cause dizziness, nausea, or fogginess that can come from either dehydration or an electrolyte imbalance, says Bar.

“One of the benefits of hot yoga is that your muscles warm up faster, but one of the disadvantages is that sometimes when you’re in a hot class you truly don’t know if you’ve pulled something or injured a ligament. Unlike muscles and tendons, ligaments aren’t meant to stretch,” she says.

Is yoga harder than gym?

Frequently Asked Questions About yoga vs gym – Both yoga and gym are different ways for you to stay healthy and fit. Both follow different routines and are entirely separate disciplines. You can compare the benefits of both and choose the one that resonates with your fitness goals.

Yoga is said to provide many benefits that a gym workout provides. In addition to it, yoga is also extremely beneficial for aspects like peace of mind, meditation, and so on. Gym is more focused on building or maintaining muscle mass. Burning more and more calories is the way to achieve weight loss goals.

While yoga does help you burn calories, gym workouts are 1.5 times more effective. This entirely depends on your goals and expectations. If your goal is to build strength, flexibility, balance as well as posture, yoga is the right choice for you. But if you want to build muscle, gym workout is the right choice.

Is yoga more than just exercise?

Physical, mental and spiritual disciplines when put together, is called Yoga. Yoga has been the pride of ancient India and we are recognized even today. Yoga was introduced in the western world by India and today it is a popular form of exercise also known as Asanas.

  • They are physical activities popularized in the west, however, in India yoga is more than just a physical form.
  • The impact of yoga has more impact on our mental and spiritual being.
  • Yoga to beat pressure! it’s something beyond exercise.
  • It is an approach to interface the physical presence with the brain.

This is actually why yoga has the ability to recuperate you from inside to defeat the staggering pressure that the present quick paced life brings. Use of asanas has proved to improve psychological health during various mental treatments. Many research work has been done and has indicated the improved postures and also that it can be helpful in treatments of mental disorders like schizophrenia. It is not just physical activity, it is also a way to work on one’s flexibility and strength.

  1. And the asanas are very easy for everyone to understand and practice in everyday life, yoga is not just something to stretch, bend or touch your toes.
  2. It is a whole lot more than that.
  3. More than mere meditation.
  4. Some asanas are about relaxation.
  5. In some, your movement is more.
  6. Many also focus on various postures, known as Asanas.

At Ayurnava, Ayurveda Yoga treatment Gurgaon, Yoga asanas also teach us to focus on our own breathing to attain peace of mind and reach our soul. Many counselors also recommend yoga asanas and meditation to their patients. Especially, to anxiety and stress disorder subjects can follow this in their everyday schedule and make a come back to streamline.

Is yoga same as gym?

Yoga vs Gym – Know the difference Is Yoga A Sport During one of the regular Yogavijnana question & answer sessions, an interesting question came up from one of the practitioners. The answer to this question given by Vinay Siddaiah has been captured here in the form of a detailed transcript and a short summary.

The transcript has been written by Chaithra Murthy. Below is the link to the original video in our YouTube Channel for those who want to watch. Question: What is the difference between going to the gym compared to doing the yoga practice everyday? Also in some people we see muscle development quite easily & am wondering if it’s just the genetics & the diet they might be following.

Some of the exercises I believe strengthen the same set of muscles be it gym or yoga for that matter. Isn’t it? Answer / thoughts by Vinay: If you look at gym and yoga, one of the main differences is the whole attitude of doing this activity itself. When you go to the gym, the whole attitude is to do something related to your body, a physical oriented practice, which is normally the goal.

  1. That’s it and no further.
  2. The higher aspects of mind are missing in the gym practice.
  3. However, in yoga the whole idea is also to get more deeper into your spiritual being.
  4. So whatever you are practicing in yoga right now acts as a tool to your ultimate goal which is normally more spiritual oriented.
  5. We do see that many people practice yoga just at a physical level and don’t bring in the mind aspect to it.

Most of the time goals will be body driven intentions such as losing weight or controlling their blood pressure, becoming more flexible, etc., The deeper you go into the practice of yoga, you realise it is mostly to do with your mind. In hatha yoga pradipika, there is a concept mentioned called “Ashta Siddhi Lakshanas” When a person goes deeper into yoga, there are visible characteristics which will be seen in a person.

  1. Some of them which I remember are that the person’s face starts glowing, his eyes become brighter, his voice becomes sharper, his body becomes leaner.
  2. Many people even market yoga saying that it makes your body leaner and you can lose weight, whereas the whole concept of mind goes missing.
  3. If you practice yoga mindfully & meditate, this is enough to lose weight or to achieve any other goals that you might have.

I meant to say if you can keep your mind calm and induce best practices into your lifestyle, this is sufficient to help you in reaching your goals. All these are part of yoga practice itself. In yoga, of course strengthening of the physical body is focussed as well.

Yoga also sees the body as a tool to achieve future goals. The whole goal of hatha yoga is to make your body stronger. This is also because your body needs to be stronger to handle the energy such as kundalini shakti and it’s awakening within. If you go in detail into yoga therapy, infact what is recommended is mind control and not body control.

Asanas are easier compared to achieving control on the mind. Question: When people talk about building their body, muscles, going to the gym etc., what can we tell them to change their mind? Answer / thoughts by Vinay: Building up a physical body is their goal, we don’t have to tell them anything or no need of convincing them otherwise.

  • Let them do what they aspire for.
  • Question: How to convince them that yoga provides all these benefits as well? I have been looking for a few points to convince them for many years.
  • Answer / thoughts by Vinay: First of all, you don’t have to convince them at all.
  • There is no need to convince anybody, as long as they are convinced in what they are doing, it is alright.

Yoga provides all these benefits as well as making people who practice leaner. However, some people might not want to be leaner, maybe they want to be bulkier. It is their motivation for exercise. A person needs to be ready on his own to practice yoga, no one can pull them into it.

  1. They should have a drive on their own to start doing something for it to be permanent.
  2. Don’t try to convince them otherwise.
  3. When I started teaching initially, in a place called Bellandur, in Bangalore (south India), some of the classes I used to teach them through gym exercises.
  4. There was a gym adjacent to the yoga studio and I would take my practitioners there and would tell them that I shall teach gym exercises using yoga practices.
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I would tell them to challenge themselves by showing them how they can imbibe concepts of yoga in what they are doing. For instance, even in the gym, a lot of people do the weight exercises in the wrong way. They would lift their dumbbells by compensating their whole body weight, leaning onto one side and struggling.

  1. Their ego was to lift more weight and compensate to lift those dead weights as high as possible.
  2. So, i told them that instead of lifting 10 kg weight, lift only 5 kg and in the manner i would show.
  3. I would give them instructions so that they can stabilize their body better and then lift the weights.
  4. But with this, I saw a lot of them struggling to lift even 5 kg weight.

Once you make them aware of their body and to lift the weights in the proper way instead of compensating with the body, they were practicing yoga in the gym. Now, they were trying to be more aware and do the gym exercise. I would say even if they are doing gym exercises, as long as they mentally aware of what they are doing and being mindful, this itself is more than enough to start with.

Question: I have seen many people who do the gym exercises or even yoga with more interest and don’t know the concept behind it or the right way to do it. Some people are more focussed on building muscles and I have tried to convince few on the benefits of yoga. They have in turn asked me what is the major benefit which we can get from yoga? I would need a few answers to give it to them.

Answer / thoughts by Vinay: Few points as mentioned before which differentiate between gym and yoga practices are

  • Gym is a physical driven intention and yoga is a mind driven intention
  • In gym people work mainly on contraction of the muscles, building the muscle tension. However in yoga the intention is to relax the muscles as much as possible by loosening the tension
  • In the gym the whole process will activate the sympathetic nervous system, so that it results in excitement or “kick” as we normally refer to it. They feel a rush in the energy as a result of physically aggressive activities. However in yoga, you activate the parasympathetic nervous system, where practitioners consciously try to calm themselves. They are also trying to reduce the mental effort while doing other physical actions
  • Nowadays, our mindset is more activity based, more aggressive in nature. Even in yoga, if you observe, people like surya namaskara more. If you make them stay still in a static asana, they wouldn’t like it. They want movements, more dynamic in nature. This movement is also driven by lack / constraint of time, in whatever little time they have they would want to satisfy their ego by having done something. Hence they go and do an extensive physical activity of many kinds resulting in feeling that they have done a lot of things in a given time. By doing all this, in fact they are draining themselves more and more. However in yoga, there is always a component of relaxation. Whenever there are asanas being done with an amount of excitement, there is also a counter asana done for relaxation resulting in balancing the whole system. By end of yoga practice you feel much calmer
  • Immediately after gym practice, the energy jumps up, after that it immediately drops down as well making you feel tired. Wheres as in Yoga, you will feel more energetic after the practice and a lot more calmer
  • When we talk about goals, in the gym practices goals are mostly physical oriented. Nowadays, people don’t have any goals for their mind, only for the body. If we look around, goals are mostly gaining weight or losing weight in a given time frame. No one goes to the gym saying, I want to calm my mind today, maybe there are few exceptions of course. They always go with a competitive mindset. For example, a person would think, I ran 10 km yesterday, today I want to run 11 km or something like, I lifted 5 kg yesterday, maybe today I want to lift 6 kg dumbbells. In yoga, there is no competition at all as we are trying to focus on the process in our lifestyle rather than a strict physical goal. Once you set the right processes, your results are bound to come. In yoga, the approach is more holistic and it encompasses multiple things such as physical asanas, pranayama, daily meditation, the way you talk to people, and the kind of food you eat. If you look at hatha yoga pradipika, there is a concept mentioned about food as “Mita ahara” or limited food intake, “Pathya” or diet is talked about as well, Even in Bhagavad Gita, food is categorised into different types, sattvic, rajasic & tamasic food and it’s effects on body and mind. All these are oriented towards creating awareness that food is extremely important. Yoga also talks about cleansing practices such as “neti”, “douthi” & a lot more different types of mental practices
  • There is a factor to train your emotions as well. In yogavijnana, the other day we did “Satsang” literally means community of truth or community of the good, which helps you train the emotional part of you. Most of the time, the results you want are not achieved just by physical activity, it has to be addressed at an emotional level as well. Sometimes the pain in your body is caused by an emotion that is bothering you, which manifests itself into physical pain. You might be holding back something emotionally and even that has to be released. In yoga, there are lot of practices to take care of your emotional being
  • There is also a concept of karma yoga. Karma yoga is to voluntarily do some service to the people or to the society. It can be any sort of service. You are supposed to dedicate yourself voluntarily to do some work without expecting anything in return. However in these days, karma yoga concepts misleads people in thinking, yoga teacher is taking advantage of our time and asking us to do some random things. However, if you go to traditional schools, even today, karma yoga is given lot of importance. If you go to some of the traditional schools, they literally make you clean public toilets as a part of karma yoga assignment. People always wonder, what exactly am I achieving by cleaning toilets, make me a daily wage worker? No, the intention is to drop your ego. Imagine the mindset a person needs to have to clean someone else’s toilet. No common person can do it so easily. Most of the time, we hesitate to even clean our own toilets instead have someone do it for us in turn for a fee.

Summary: Yogatends to work on different dimensions of our body and mind, which are missing in the gym practice. Here are some points to highlight the main differences:

  1. Gym normally focuses on physically driven practices or goals. However, yoga focuses not only on the physical body but also on the realm of mind
  2. The gym works towards creating contraction or building the tension in the muscles whereas yoga focuses on relaxing the muscles
  3. The gym focuses on activating the sympathetic nervous system giving a high feeling/kick as we call it, however, yoga focuses on activating our parasympathetic system, helping us to calm ourselves
  4. Gym feeds into an activity-based mindset which is evident everywhere and with most of the people. Always wanting to do something and not sitting still. In yoga, there are practices to stay still in asanas, meditation, and several other practices helping to calm ourselves which in turn creates an acute focus in what we do.
  5. After gym practice even though we feel energetic immediately, after a short while, the body feels tired. After yoga, you always feel more energetic in both body and mind
  6. The gym always gives you physical goals whereas yoga focuses on the process rather than goals. This helps us eventually achieving both physical and mental goals
  7. Gym practices talk about diet restrictions which in turn only satisfies the physical goals whereas, in yoga, the food being the important aspect focuses not just on feeding the physical body but also to control the mind. We are what we eat.
  8. Yoga deals with a lot of cleansing practices (neti, douthi) which energizes the body and mind inside out.
  9. Yoga also focuses on your emotional being treating you holistically. Releasing and training your emotions will compose you overall. If your emotions are calmer, your health is achieved automatically
  10. Yoga teaches us the concept of karma yoga, doing something voluntarily to people or society without expecting anything in return. This in turn helps us to shed our ego resulting in better human beings

: Yoga vs Gym – Know the difference

Is yoga a religion or exercise?

Is yoga a religion or philosophy? Although yoga has its roots in religion it’s not in itself a religion and is better understood as a spiritual practice. However, yoga has a strong philosophy – the philosophy that the spirit, the mind and the body are one.

Is yoga a science or exercise?

Yoga is generally considered a safe form of physical activity for healthy people when it’s done properly, under the guidance of a qualified instructor. But it’s possible to get hurt practicing yoga—just as when participating in other physical activities.

Which country do yoga most?

1. India – Is Yoga A Sport Of course, talking about the best places in the world to do yoga, I had to first and foremost mention the birth country of yoga! India is about as famous for its yoga as it is for the Taj Mahal, or Holi Festival. Come to India to do yoga and you will learn more than simply the different asanas (poses).

You will learn a spirituality and a way of life. Visit Rishakesh for an authentic taste of where yoga all began. However, if you would rather soak up some Indian sun whilst also getting enlightened, head to chilled out Kerala or the hippy enclave of Goa, where you will be spoilt for choice for yoga classes, workshops, courses and retreats.

Whether you want to do your yoga teacher training or simply learn more about this ancient and ever-growing practise, India is the place to be. Not only is it an authentic experience, but it’s also incredibly inexpensive. photo via Runaway Brit

Has yoga been scientifically proven?

Although there’s been a lot of research on the health effects of yoga, many studies have included only small numbers of people and haven’t been of high quality. Therefore, in most instances, we can only say that yoga has shown promise for particular health uses, not that it’s been proven to help.

Can yoga build muscle?

Does Yoga Build Muscle? – Yes, yoga is a popular practice to help build muscle. Yoga practice particularly focuses on building internal, lean muscle. Yoga has the potential to increase fat loss, develop muscle tone, and build flexibility — leading to a more lean body. It can help increase strength in many of your muscle groups.

Is yoga considered PE?

Yoga as P.E. – As a part of the effort to get our schools and students moving, yoga provides one way of enriching the standard Physical Education curriculum to be at once more inclusive and more relevant to students of any age. Not only does yoga build upon basic tenants of physical fitness, such as muscle strength, bone strength, and flexibility, but it does so in a way that is developmentally appropriate, accessible, and non-competitive for students of diverse capacities.

Does yoga count as training?

Yoga Can Improve Muscle Strength Many poses in yoga are a form of body weight training that uses your body weight for resistance, for example the handstand or the plank. Certain positions and poses, just by leveraging your body weight, will challenge a muscle and make it stronger, says Laskowski.

Which country has listed yoga as a sports activities?

The government of Saudi Arabia declared Yoga as a Sports Activity. With this move, Yoga is now an official sport practised under the Saudi Ministry of trade and industry.

Is yoga same as gym?

Yoga vs Gym – Know the difference Is Yoga A Sport During one of the regular Yogavijnana question & answer sessions, an interesting question came up from one of the practitioners. The answer to this question given by Vinay Siddaiah has been captured here in the form of a detailed transcript and a short summary.

The transcript has been written by Chaithra Murthy. Below is the link to the original video in our YouTube Channel for those who want to watch. Question: What is the difference between going to the gym compared to doing the yoga practice everyday? Also in some people we see muscle development quite easily & am wondering if it’s just the genetics & the diet they might be following.

Some of the exercises I believe strengthen the same set of muscles be it gym or yoga for that matter. Isn’t it? Answer / thoughts by Vinay: If you look at gym and yoga, one of the main differences is the whole attitude of doing this activity itself. When you go to the gym, the whole attitude is to do something related to your body, a physical oriented practice, which is normally the goal.

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That’s it and no further. The higher aspects of mind are missing in the gym practice. However, in yoga the whole idea is also to get more deeper into your spiritual being. So whatever you are practicing in yoga right now acts as a tool to your ultimate goal which is normally more spiritual oriented. We do see that many people practice yoga just at a physical level and don’t bring in the mind aspect to it.

Most of the time goals will be body driven intentions such as losing weight or controlling their blood pressure, becoming more flexible, etc., The deeper you go into the practice of yoga, you realise it is mostly to do with your mind. In hatha yoga pradipika, there is a concept mentioned called “Ashta Siddhi Lakshanas” When a person goes deeper into yoga, there are visible characteristics which will be seen in a person.

Some of them which I remember are that the person’s face starts glowing, his eyes become brighter, his voice becomes sharper, his body becomes leaner. Many people even market yoga saying that it makes your body leaner and you can lose weight, whereas the whole concept of mind goes missing. If you practice yoga mindfully & meditate, this is enough to lose weight or to achieve any other goals that you might have.

I meant to say if you can keep your mind calm and induce best practices into your lifestyle, this is sufficient to help you in reaching your goals. All these are part of yoga practice itself. In yoga, of course strengthening of the physical body is focussed as well.

  1. Yoga also sees the body as a tool to achieve future goals.
  2. The whole goal of hatha yoga is to make your body stronger.
  3. This is also because your body needs to be stronger to handle the energy such as kundalini shakti and it’s awakening within.
  4. If you go in detail into yoga therapy, infact what is recommended is mind control and not body control.

Asanas are easier compared to achieving control on the mind. Question: When people talk about building their body, muscles, going to the gym etc., what can we tell them to change their mind? Answer / thoughts by Vinay: Building up a physical body is their goal, we don’t have to tell them anything or no need of convincing them otherwise.

Let them do what they aspire for. Question: How to convince them that yoga provides all these benefits as well? I have been looking for a few points to convince them for many years. Answer / thoughts by Vinay: First of all, you don’t have to convince them at all. There is no need to convince anybody, as long as they are convinced in what they are doing, it is alright.

Yoga provides all these benefits as well as making people who practice leaner. However, some people might not want to be leaner, maybe they want to be bulkier. It is their motivation for exercise. A person needs to be ready on his own to practice yoga, no one can pull them into it.

  1. They should have a drive on their own to start doing something for it to be permanent.
  2. Don’t try to convince them otherwise.
  3. When I started teaching initially, in a place called Bellandur, in Bangalore (south India), some of the classes I used to teach them through gym exercises.
  4. There was a gym adjacent to the yoga studio and I would take my practitioners there and would tell them that I shall teach gym exercises using yoga practices.

I would tell them to challenge themselves by showing them how they can imbibe concepts of yoga in what they are doing. For instance, even in the gym, a lot of people do the weight exercises in the wrong way. They would lift their dumbbells by compensating their whole body weight, leaning onto one side and struggling.

  1. Their ego was to lift more weight and compensate to lift those dead weights as high as possible.
  2. So, i told them that instead of lifting 10 kg weight, lift only 5 kg and in the manner i would show.
  3. I would give them instructions so that they can stabilize their body better and then lift the weights.
  4. But with this, I saw a lot of them struggling to lift even 5 kg weight.

Once you make them aware of their body and to lift the weights in the proper way instead of compensating with the body, they were practicing yoga in the gym. Now, they were trying to be more aware and do the gym exercise. I would say even if they are doing gym exercises, as long as they mentally aware of what they are doing and being mindful, this itself is more than enough to start with.

Question: I have seen many people who do the gym exercises or even yoga with more interest and don’t know the concept behind it or the right way to do it. Some people are more focussed on building muscles and I have tried to convince few on the benefits of yoga. They have in turn asked me what is the major benefit which we can get from yoga? I would need a few answers to give it to them.

Answer / thoughts by Vinay: Few points as mentioned before which differentiate between gym and yoga practices are

  • Gym is a physical driven intention and yoga is a mind driven intention
  • In gym people work mainly on contraction of the muscles, building the muscle tension. However in yoga the intention is to relax the muscles as much as possible by loosening the tension
  • In the gym the whole process will activate the sympathetic nervous system, so that it results in excitement or “kick” as we normally refer to it. They feel a rush in the energy as a result of physically aggressive activities. However in yoga, you activate the parasympathetic nervous system, where practitioners consciously try to calm themselves. They are also trying to reduce the mental effort while doing other physical actions
  • Nowadays, our mindset is more activity based, more aggressive in nature. Even in yoga, if you observe, people like surya namaskara more. If you make them stay still in a static asana, they wouldn’t like it. They want movements, more dynamic in nature. This movement is also driven by lack / constraint of time, in whatever little time they have they would want to satisfy their ego by having done something. Hence they go and do an extensive physical activity of many kinds resulting in feeling that they have done a lot of things in a given time. By doing all this, in fact they are draining themselves more and more. However in yoga, there is always a component of relaxation. Whenever there are asanas being done with an amount of excitement, there is also a counter asana done for relaxation resulting in balancing the whole system. By end of yoga practice you feel much calmer
  • Immediately after gym practice, the energy jumps up, after that it immediately drops down as well making you feel tired. Wheres as in Yoga, you will feel more energetic after the practice and a lot more calmer
  • When we talk about goals, in the gym practices goals are mostly physical oriented. Nowadays, people don’t have any goals for their mind, only for the body. If we look around, goals are mostly gaining weight or losing weight in a given time frame. No one goes to the gym saying, I want to calm my mind today, maybe there are few exceptions of course. They always go with a competitive mindset. For example, a person would think, I ran 10 km yesterday, today I want to run 11 km or something like, I lifted 5 kg yesterday, maybe today I want to lift 6 kg dumbbells. In yoga, there is no competition at all as we are trying to focus on the process in our lifestyle rather than a strict physical goal. Once you set the right processes, your results are bound to come. In yoga, the approach is more holistic and it encompasses multiple things such as physical asanas, pranayama, daily meditation, the way you talk to people, and the kind of food you eat. If you look at hatha yoga pradipika, there is a concept mentioned about food as “Mita ahara” or limited food intake, “Pathya” or diet is talked about as well, Even in Bhagavad Gita, food is categorised into different types, sattvic, rajasic & tamasic food and it’s effects on body and mind. All these are oriented towards creating awareness that food is extremely important. Yoga also talks about cleansing practices such as “neti”, “douthi” & a lot more different types of mental practices
  • There is a factor to train your emotions as well. In yogavijnana, the other day we did “Satsang” literally means community of truth or community of the good, which helps you train the emotional part of you. Most of the time, the results you want are not achieved just by physical activity, it has to be addressed at an emotional level as well. Sometimes the pain in your body is caused by an emotion that is bothering you, which manifests itself into physical pain. You might be holding back something emotionally and even that has to be released. In yoga, there are lot of practices to take care of your emotional being
  • There is also a concept of karma yoga. Karma yoga is to voluntarily do some service to the people or to the society. It can be any sort of service. You are supposed to dedicate yourself voluntarily to do some work without expecting anything in return. However in these days, karma yoga concepts misleads people in thinking, yoga teacher is taking advantage of our time and asking us to do some random things. However, if you go to traditional schools, even today, karma yoga is given lot of importance. If you go to some of the traditional schools, they literally make you clean public toilets as a part of karma yoga assignment. People always wonder, what exactly am I achieving by cleaning toilets, make me a daily wage worker? No, the intention is to drop your ego. Imagine the mindset a person needs to have to clean someone else’s toilet. No common person can do it so easily. Most of the time, we hesitate to even clean our own toilets instead have someone do it for us in turn for a fee.

Summary: Yogatends to work on different dimensions of our body and mind, which are missing in the gym practice. Here are some points to highlight the main differences:

  1. Gym normally focuses on physically driven practices or goals. However, yoga focuses not only on the physical body but also on the realm of mind
  2. The gym works towards creating contraction or building the tension in the muscles whereas yoga focuses on relaxing the muscles
  3. The gym focuses on activating the sympathetic nervous system giving a high feeling/kick as we call it, however, yoga focuses on activating our parasympathetic system, helping us to calm ourselves
  4. Gym feeds into an activity-based mindset which is evident everywhere and with most of the people. Always wanting to do something and not sitting still. In yoga, there are practices to stay still in asanas, meditation, and several other practices helping to calm ourselves which in turn creates an acute focus in what we do.
  5. After gym practice even though we feel energetic immediately, after a short while, the body feels tired. After yoga, you always feel more energetic in both body and mind
  6. The gym always gives you physical goals whereas yoga focuses on the process rather than goals. This helps us eventually achieving both physical and mental goals
  7. Gym practices talk about diet restrictions which in turn only satisfies the physical goals whereas, in yoga, the food being the important aspect focuses not just on feeding the physical body but also to control the mind. We are what we eat.
  8. Yoga deals with a lot of cleansing practices (neti, douthi) which energizes the body and mind inside out.
  9. Yoga also focuses on your emotional being treating you holistically. Releasing and training your emotions will compose you overall. If your emotions are calmer, your health is achieved automatically
  10. Yoga teaches us the concept of karma yoga, doing something voluntarily to people or society without expecting anything in return. This in turn helps us to shed our ego resulting in better human beings

: Yoga vs Gym – Know the difference