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Is Karate A Sport?

Is Karate A Sport
Sport – Karate Kumite pictograms of Olympic sports Female kumite at Karate1 Premier League, 2018 Karate Fighting Championship Gichin Funakoshi ( 船越 義珍 ) said, “There are no contests in karate.” In pre–World War II Okinawa, kumite was not part of karate training. Shigeru Egami relates that, in 1940, some karateka were ousted from their dōjō because they adopted sparring after having learned it in Tokyo.

  1. Arate is divided into style organizations.
  2. These organizations sometimes cooperate in non-style specific sport karate organizations or federations.
  3. Examples of sport organizations include AAKF/ITKF, AOK, TKL, AKA, WKF, NWUKO, WUKF and WKC.
  4. Organizations hold competitions (tournaments) from local to international level.

Tournaments are designed to match members of opposing schools or styles against one another in kata, sparring and weapons demonstration. They are often separated by age, rank and sex with potentially different rules or standards based on these factors.

  • The tournament may be exclusively for members of a particular style (closed) or one in which any martial artist from any style may participate within the rules of the tournament (open).
  • The World Karate Federation (WKF) is the largest sport karate organization and is recognized by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) as being responsible for karate competition in the Olympic Games.

The WKF has developed common rules governing all styles. The national WKF organizations coordinate with their respective National Olympic Committees, WKF has appointed Shin Koyamada as its first Goodwill Ambassador in 2022 to promote Karate globally. WKF karate competition has two disciplines: sparring ( kumite ) and forms ( kata ).

  • Competitors may enter either as individuals or as part of a team.
  • Evaluation for kata and kobudō is performed by a panel of judges, whereas sparring is judged by a head referee, usually with assistant referees at the side of the sparring area.
  • Sparring matches are typically divided by weight, age, gender, and experience.

WKF only allows membership through one national organization/federation per country to which clubs may join. The World Union of Karate-do Federations (WUKF) offers different styles and federations a world body they may join, without having to compromise their style or size.

The WUKF accepts more than one federation or association per country. Sport organizations use different competition rule systems. Light contact rules are used by the WKF, WUKO, IASK and WKC. Full contact karate rules used by Kyokushinkai, Seidokaikan and other organizations. Bogu kumite (full contact with protective shielding of targets) rules are used in the World Koshiki Karate-Do Federation organization.

Shinkaratedo Federation use boxing gloves. Within the United States, rules may be under the jurisdiction of state sports authorities, such as the boxing commission. In August 2016, the International Olympic Committee approved karate as an Olympic sport beginning at the 2020 Summer Olympics,

Is karate an art or a sport?

Techniques – Traditional karate is a lifetime study and pursuit. In this form of karate, one practices techniques repeatedly to perfect them. The techniques are crisp, showing power and control over the body. In sport karate, the techniques are more fluid and reactive, designed for modern-day combat.

Why is karate considered a sport?

What is a sport? Is karate one? – According to our friends at, one of the definitions of the word “sport” is – an activity involving physical exertion and skill in which an individual or team competes against another or others for entertainment. To that end, we know that karate is an activity that involves physical exertion and skill, and sees individuals or teams competing against one another for entertainment. Is Karate A Sport Yes, karate is a sport!

Is karate a sport or an exercise?

What Is Karate? A little bit of info about the sport Karate is an ideal sport for both men and women as it provides a full-body workout while practicing self-defence. It helps to develop improved balance and posture, flexibility and strength. Regular exercise can also reduce blood pressure and improve cardio fitness.

  1. Participants can work at their own pace, which is great for those who haven’t exercised in some time.
  2. Many people choose to learn karate as a form of self-defence, however students also learn about conflict avoidance.
  3. Practicing karate helps to improve concentration and focus leading to improved performance at school and work, regular training can also help to increase confidence and self-esteem through the achievement of goals.

Many employers value the commitment and dedication demonstrated by training karate. Shotokan Karate is a fighting system which combines stillness with motion, expansion with contraction, and explosive power with gentle fluidity. Students develop effective blocking and evasion techniques, powerful punching and striking combinations, spectacular kicks, and a repertoire of sweeps, throws and locks.

  1. The Shotokan style was developed from various martial arts by Master Gichin Funakoshi (1868–1957), an Okinawan teacher of physical education who introduced it to Japan in 1922.
  2. Originally developed into the famous Japan Karate Association, Shotokan now exists as many different organisations including Japan Karate Shoto Federation with Headquarters in Japan and a global membership.

The Shotokan Karate practiced at the dojo today has undergone decades of evolution by following methods developed in modern sports sciences. Shotokan Karate has now become a graceful, dynamic martial art that is both powerful and beautiful without compromising the traditional teachings of its founder, Gichin Funakoshi. Is Karate A Sport Is Karate A Sport © 2015-2019 TKF – Traditional Karate & Fitness. Marsham, NR10 5QZ Traditional Karate & Fitness Lessons inBeccles, Costessey, Cringleford, Eaton, Mile Cross and North Walsham : What Is Karate?

What type of sport is karate?

karate, (Japanese: “empty hand”) unarmed martial-arts discipline employing kicking, striking, and defensive blocking with arms and legs. Emphasis is on concentrating as much of the body’s power as possible at the point and instant of impact. Striking surfaces include the hands (particularly the knuckles and the outer edge), ball of the foot, heel, forearm, knee, and elbow.

All are toughened by practice blows against padded surfaces or wood. Pine boards up to several inches in thickness can be broken by the bare hand or foot of an expert. Timing, tactics, and spirit, however, are each considered at least as important as physical toughening. In sporting karate and sparring ( kumite ) in training, blows and kicks are stopped short, preferably within an inch of contact.

Sporting matches commonly last about three minutes, to a decision, if neither contestant has scored a clean “killing” point in the estimation of the judges. Contests of form ( kata ) are also held, in which single competitors perform predetermined series of movements simulating defense and counterattack against several opponents. Is Karate A Sport Britannica Quiz Quick Quiz: Martial Arts Karate evolved in East Asia over a period of centuries, becoming systematized in Okinawa in the 17th century, probably by people forbidden to carry weapons. It was imported into Japan in the 1920s. Several schools and systems developed, each favouring somewhat different techniques and training methods.

Is karate Kid actually karate?

“Only root Karate come from Miyagi.” – There are two styles of martial arts represented in The Karate Kid, Okinawan Karate and Korean Tang Soo Do. Kreese’s Karate is Tang Soo Do mostly because the choreographer for the original films was Grandmaster Pat E.

Johnson, a leading proponent of that style. Although most likely the product of coincidence, it fit Kreese’s character perfectly. Many U.S. soldiers who served in Korea brought Tang Soo Do back to the states when they returned, just like Kreese, including Johnson and his martial comrade, Chuck Norris. In Season 3 of Cobra Kai, Kreese’s backstory confirms what martial arts fans have always suspected – that his style of Karate is in fact, Tang Soo Do.

Calling it “Karate” was not inaccurate. Few Americans know Tang Soo Do, so even today, some schools market themselves as “Korean Karate.” Tang Soo Do is a predecessor of Taekwondo. Taekwondo is the other Asian martial art in the Olympics alongside Judo, but this is soon to change.

  1. Miyagi-Do is derived from a branch of Karate known as of Goju-Ryu.
  2. Writer Robert Mark Kamen had learned some Goju-Ryu which inspired him to create Mr. Miyagi.
  3. He even poached the name of the founder of Goju-Ryu, Chojun Miyagi, and adapted the history to fit the Miyagi family history for The Karate Kid II where they travel to Okinawa.

Goju means “hard-soft.” “Karate legend Miyagi Chojun gave the name ‘hard-soft’ to the style in the mid-1930s,” explains Bayer. Bayer finds the contrast between Miyagi’s and Kreese’s philosophies more intriguing than their difference of styles. “I see the first movie of the trilogy as the most important in terms of establishing the two contrasting mindsets of Mr.

Is taekwondo a sport yes or no?

Taekwondo and the Olympics – Taekwondo made its debut as a demonstration Olympic sport at the 1988 Seoul Games, and became an official medal sport at the 2000 Sydney Games. There are several taekwondo styles. World Taekwondo oversees the Kukkiwon-defined style of taekwondo that is commonly referred to as Olympic taekwondo.

Is Kung Fu a sport?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This article is about the modern sport. For other uses, see Wushu,

Wushu

Also known as Kung fu, CMA, WS
Focus Striking, Grappling, Throwing, Performance Martial Art
Country of origin Greater China
Famous practitioners See: Category:Wushu practitioners

table> Sport

Highest governing body International Wushu Federation First played China Characteristics Contact Dependent on type of Wushu Team members Individuals or Team Mixed-sex Yes Type Martial art Venue Taolu Carpet or Lei Tai (fighting arena) Presence Country or region Worldwide Olympic (Unofficial Sport) 2008 World Championships 1991 World Games (Invitational Sport) 2009, 2013, 2022

table>

Wushu Traditional Chinese 武術 Simplified Chinese 武术 Literal meaning “Martial arts”
Transcriptions

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Wushu (), or Kung fu, is a hard and soft and complete martial art, as well as a full-contact combat sport, It has a long history in reference to Chinese martial arts, It was developed in 1949 in an effort to standardize the practice of traditional Chinese martial arts, yet attempts to structure the various decentralized martial arts traditions date back earlier, when the Central Guoshu Institute was established at Nanking in 1928.

Is taekwondo a sport or an art?

Is Taekwondo a Martial Art or a Sport? SportsEdTV Taekwondo is committed to bringing athletes, coaches, and parents pro-level taekwondo education videos for FREE. All levels, anywhere, anytime. Check out our and to join our taekwondo community! Taekwondo – a martial art of Korean origin – became an Olympic sport at the Summer Olympic Games in Sydney – Australia in 2000.

In the combat sports called martial arts, Taekwondo joined judo which was first included in the Summer Olympic Games at the 1964 Games in Tokyo, Japan. This participation in the Olympic Games changed Taekwondo. First of all, the worldwide broadcasting of Olympic competitions, including 28 sports during the Summer Games, allowed Taekwondo to acquire a global audience.

But above all, it opened the way for thousands of Taekwondo practitioners to participate in the Olympic Games. A tough race, only 16 athletes per category, can qualify divided into 4 categories for men, 4 categories for women (total 128 athletes). This race to qualify for the Olympic Games transformed the training practices.

Taekwondo became a high-level performance sport with this participation in the Olympic Games that required an assiduous, systematic, and intense preparation.The traditional preparation for Taekwondo is through the learning of Poomsae. If you start taking, you will learn a series of Poomsae called Taekgeuks that incorporate the following elements : Technique Knowledge Attitude Concentration Posture Timing Power Breathing

Mastery of the Poomsae, a series of attack and defense forms, allows for progress in the sport. A competent instructor can discern a student’s knowledge, skill level, strength, and concentration simply by watching him or her perform these forms. A Poomsae is composed of Taekwondo-specific techniques of blocking, striking, and kicking.

  1. The movements must be performed with precision.
  2. Blocking movements should start and stop where they will be effective.
  3. Striking techniques should begin with the hip and be followed by an appropriate movement.
  4. Balance, control, and proper foot position should be used for kicking.
  5. Posture and balance are about controlling the center of gravity.

Correct posture, from a good position, allows the practitioner to use maximum force. Balance allows the practitioner to control this force and move on to the next technique quickly and efficiently. The movements are carried out using phases of tension and relaxation in the movements of the body.

In the preparatory phase, relaxation is used. This gives speed to the technique. As the impact approaches, tension is applied. One should breathe in during the preparatory movement and breathe out during the execution of the technique. Learning when and how to use these elements is one of the most important lessons of Poomsae practice.

Finally, Poomsae is a “simulated fight”; practitioners must watch where their imaginary opponent is. Imagining an opponent helps develop precision in attack and defense techniques. Center punches should hit the imaginary opponent’s chest, high blocks should redirect high punches, and high kicks should hit the opponent’s face.

The practitioner places these attack and defense techniques depending on his or her ability to “see” attacks and openings. Mastering successive Poomsae that increase in complexity allows the practitioner to progress and graduate to different belts via tests. Olympic Taekwondo is a form of sparring () with contact.

We are therefore no longer in simulated fights and the application of highly codified techniques as described above. For the athlete, the important thing is to score points while respecting the rules of competition referenced in articles on Kyorugi rules.

  1. Often the techniques used correspond to the basic techniques but are often executed to optimize speed and reactivity.
  2. Technical purity and power are secondary.
  3. What matters is to hit in the allowed areas as quickly as possible, and it is not necessary to develop the maximum power possible to score points.

For example, a touch to the head is enough to score points. This is perfect for the athletes’ safety because kyorugi fights are not aimed at destroying the opponent. An athlete will optimize preparation by working on reactivity, speed, and agility. The athlete will select effective techniques that suit him best.

For some, Taekwondo practice becomes a targeted training to score points and win a sparring match. It is no longer necessary to go through all the martial art training described above to be effective. On the contrary, a fixation on basic techniques can even prove to be a disadvantage in sparring matches.

Some athletes from other disciplines such as kickboxing can also quickly join Taekwondo teams. Let’s not forget, Taekwondo is about winning Olympic medals. So, is Taekwondo a sport or martial art? The debate rages on in the Taekwondo community. Supporters of the sport are pleased with the media presence of Taekwondo at the Olympic Games.

  • Some countries have won their first-ever Olympic medal through Taekwondo: in 2008 at the Beijing Olympics, Rohullah Nikpai won a bronze medal in Taekwondo – the first-ever medal for Afghanistan.
  • And the national Olympic committees invest considerable amounts of money in the preparation of taekwondo athletes.

Supporters of martial art lament the lack of martial spirit in Olympic sparring, where a light touch can win matches. However, one important rallying point is that it is required for participation in an international competition to have at least a first Dan. A kyorugi match: sparring with contact Poomsae Competition: an athlete performs a simulated fight Share This Story, Choose Your Platform! Please sign in in order to rate the blog. : Is Taekwondo a Martial Art or a Sport?

Does karate make you athletic?

Martial arts has been shown to improve balance, flexibility, speed and agility – all of which are skills that will help your child excel in other sports. We recommend athletes of all ages supplement their training with martial arts to stay well-rounded!

How easy is it to learn karate?

Karate

Is Karate A Sport Karate is a martial art that has gained popularity in recent years. It is often taught in schools and is considered one of the easier martial arts to learn. This is because karate does not require its practitioners to be physically strong. Rather, karate relies on quick and precise movements to disable an opponent.

  1. The basic principles of karate are relatively simple- balance, the economy of motion, and breathing control.
  2. There are three main components to karate: striking, kicking, and blocking.
  3. Since there are not many complex techniques involved, karate is relatively easy to learn.
  4. The basic moves are very simple and can be executed by anyone, regardless of their fitness level or athleticism.

Also, it does not require any special equipment. All you need is a pair of comfortable clothes, and you are good to go!

What are karate people called?

‘karateka’ (空手家?) ‘judoka’ (柔道家)

What is not allowed in karate?

Karate Combat Rules And Regulations Contestants are expected to behave according to the etiquette of karate-do and demonstrate fighting spirit throughout the entire bout Definition “Karate Combat” is a unique combat sport and a league operated by KOKO Sports Management LLC.

  • Bouts are contested in the specially designed Karate Combat Pit. The Fighting Area may be modified according to the requirements and/or specifications established by the presiding regulatory body or commission
  • Adjacent to the fighting area shall be a platform/space suitable for the licensed seconds and commission inspectors to view the action from above the pit.
  • Equipment
  • For each bout, the promoter shall provide a clean water bucket, a clean plastic water bottle, a stool, and any other supplies as directed by the Commission, in each corner.
  • Specifications for Hand Wrapping, Ankle/Foot Wrapping and Supportive Braces
  • All issues pertaining to Hand Wrapping, Ankle/Foot Wrapping and the use of Supportive Braces shall be determined by the presiding regulatory body or commission.
  • Mouthpieces
  • All contestants are required to bring and wear a mouthpiece during competition and provide an alternate. The mouthpiece shall be subject to examination and approval by presiding commission designees.
  • The round cannot begin without the mouthpiece in place.
  • If the mouthpiece is involuntarily dislodged during competition, the referee can call time, clean the mouthpiece, and reinsert the cleaned mouthpiece at the first opportune moment without interfering with the immediate action. Alternatively, the referee may call for the alternate mouthpiece.

Protective Equipment

  • Male Karate contestants shall bring and wear a groin protector of their own selection, of a type approved by the Commission.
  • Female Karate contestants may bring and wear a chest protector during competition. The chest protector shall be subject to approval of the Commission.
  • Contestants shall wear Karate Combat mitts with a net weight of four ounces.

Apparel

  • Male contestants must wear an official Karate Combat uniform when entering the PIT fighting area. During the fight, contestants will only wear karate trousers.
  • The karate uniform will be of official design and material sanctioned by Karate Combat.
  • The appearance of national emblems, flags of the country and labels shall occur according to the policies of the presiding commission.
  • The contestants must wear Karate Belts approved by the Commission.
  • The trousers must be long enough to cover at least two-thirds of the shin and must not reach below the anklebone. Trouser legs may not be rolled up.
  • Female contestants must wear Commission approved and Karate Combat approved attire.
  • Shoes and any type of footwear are prohibited during competition.
  • Coaches and other accompanying personnel must wear promoter approved apparel.

Appearance

  • Each unarmed combatant must be clean and present a tidy appearance.
  • A small amount of petroleum jelly as determined by the commission may be applied to the mask portion of the face. No other products may be used on either the face, head or body.
  • The Commission shall determine whether the head or facial hair presents any hazard to the safety of the unarmed combatant or his opponent or will interfere with the supervision and conduct of the contest or exhibition. If the head or facial hair of an unarmed combatant presents such a hazard or will interfere with the supervision and conduct of the contest or exhibition, the unarmed combatant may not compete in the contest or exhibition unless the circumstances creating the hazard or potential interference are corrected to the satisfaction of the Commission.
  • An unarmed combatant may not wear any makeup, face or body-paint, jewelry or other piercing accessories while competing in the contest or exhibition.
  • Contestants must have short fingernails and must not wear metallic or other objects which might injure their opponent.
  1. Karate Combat weight divisions
  2. KARATE COMBAT events feature single-match contests between well-matched, skilled karate fighters in the same weight division.
  3. DIVISION WEIGHT ALLOWABLE WEIGHT SPREAD
  4. Women’s Strawweight (115 LB / 52.2KG) Determined by the presiding commission
  5. Women’s Flyweight (125 LB / 56.7 KG) Determined by the presiding commission
  6. Women’s Bantamweight (135 LB / 61.2 KG) Determined by the presiding commission
  7. Women’s Featherweight (145 LB / 65.8 KG) Determined by the presiding commission
  8. Men’s Bantamweight (135 LB / 61 KG) Determined by the presiding commission
  9. Men’s Lightweight (150 LB / 68 KG) Determined by the presiding commission
  10. Men’s Welterweight (165 LB / 75 KG) Determined by the presiding commission
  11. Men’s Middleweight (185 LB / 84 KG) Determined by the presiding commission
  12. Men’s Heavyweight (205 LB / 93 KG) Determined by the presiding commission
  13. Men’s Super-Heavyweight (over 205 LB / over 93 KG) Determined by the presiding commission
  14. Karate Combat bouts may also be contracted at a Catchweight with the permission of the presiding commission.
  15. General Bout Description
  • Each non-title Karate Combat contest shall be 3 rounds. Each round shall be 3 minutes in duration, with a rest period of 1 minute between each round. Title/Championship fights are 5 rounds.
  • Preceding the bell to begin each bout the referee will instruct each fighter to perform a traditional karate bow to their opponent with the following commands: Yoi (ready), Otega-ni Rei (bow to each other).
  • During the fighting action when one fighter becomes grounded* the referee will signal with a raised hand to the timekeeper to start the countdown. A digital countdown timer will start to count back from five (5) to one (1) representing the length of time that the standing fighter may continue their legal attack and the downed fighter may fight back from the ground. The countdown will stop at the sound. In case the countdown timer is not available the referee will start an audible countdown from five (5) to one (1). At the end of the “Five-Count”, the referee will separate the fighters, order the downed fighter to immediately stand and quickly restart the action from that same position in the pit. During this restart, both fighters shall maintain their defense. A downed fighter who fails to immediately rise at the command of the referee risks warnings, penalization, disqualification or loss by TKO.
  • *The definition of a grounded fighter is determined by the regulatory jurisdiction if it differs in any way from the definition provided below: A fighter is considered grounded when any part of the body other than the soles of their feet are touching the fighting area floor
  • Note that the Pit Wall is NOT considered the ground. In reference to the pit wall, a fighter shall only be considered grounded if he is directly facing the wall and has both hands on it.
  • When a fighter is attacking his downed opponent, he may do so only with hand strikes and he must maintain an upright and controlled position while attacking. When one of the fighters considered grounded hammerfist and ridge-hand strikes are not allowed. The “top” fighter may place a single knee on his downed opponent, but once a second knee goes (and stays) down, or both fighters are considered grounded, the referee will stop the action, stand the fighters and immediately restart the action from that same position in the pit.
  • During the rest period between rounds, the fighters licensed second and cutman will enter the pit to address the fighters’ needs under the supervision of a commission inspector.
  • Whenever a fighter is injured by a foul that causes time to be stopped or is finished by KO or TKO, the uninjured opponent shall assume the traditional kneeling position (seiza) on the opposite side of the pit until the opponent has recovered or the referee indicates that the uninjured fighter should rise.
  • A fighter may submit to his opponent by either tapping their hand continuously on any area of the pit, placing one knee on the ground and one hand above their head or by verbally submitting to the referee. A fighter’s chief second may concede the match by a method determined by the presiding commission.

Stopping Contest

  • The referee and/or the ringside physician (as determined by the presiding commission) are the only individuals authorized to stop a contest.
  • The fighter’s Chief Second may concede the match by a method determined by the presiding commission.
  • The fighter is permitted to concede the match to their opponent at any time during the bout by the following methods:
  • Tapping their hand continuously on any area of the PIT
  • Placing one knee on the ground and one hand above the head iii) Verbally submitting to the referee

Judging/Scoring

  • All bouts will be evaluated and scored by 3 judges who shall evaluate the contest from different locations around the PIT fighting area. The referee may not be one of the 3 judges.
  • Judges shall evaluate karate techniques, such as effective striking, effective takedowns and control of the PIT fighting area, effective aggressiveness and defense.
  • Effective striking is evaluated by determining the total number of impactful legal strikes landed by a contestant
  • Effective takedowns are evaluated by considering the number of successful executions of a legal takedown followed by efforts to finish the fight.
  • Fighting area control is judged by determining who is dictating the pace, location and position of the bout.
  • Effective aggressiveness means moving forward and landing a legal strike.
  • Effective defense means avoiding being struck or taken down while countering with offensive attacks.
  • A 10-point must system will be used during the bout based on effective fighting according to the criteria listed above. Karate Combat prioritizes productive aggressiveness so the fighter who gets results based on attacking should be favored over a fighter who counters if the results of the fighting action are similar.

Legal Techniques LEGAL TECHNIQUES while standing:

  • All punching and hand striking techniques executed with the closed fist directed to the front and sides of the head, and the torso above the beltline. Ridge-hand strikes are also legal.
  • All kicking techniques delivered to the frontline and side of the head, and torso above the beltline. Roundhouse or hooking kicks (non-linear or thrusting) kicks delivered to legs below the knees only.
  • Sweeps, reaps and throws (other than those listed as fouls below)

LEGAL TECHNIQUES while one fighter is grounded:

  • The standing fighter may attack only with legal hand strikes.
  • The grounded fighter may attack with all legal strikes (including kicks as per stand up rules).

FOULS – Including but not limited to:

  • Striking with an open hand (other than a ridge-hand strike), or striking with the fingers to any target
  • Striking with hammerfist or ridge-hand strikes when a fighter is grounded
  • Striking with the elbow, forearm or head
  • Kicking the portion of the leg below the hip and above the lower part of the knee
  • Striking or grabbing the throat in any way
  • Striking to the spine or the back of the head
  • Kicking, stepping on, stomping, jumping on or throwing oneself on a grounded opponent
  • Groin attacks of any kind
  • Grabbing the opponent’s head with either hand or holding the head with one hand and striking with the other
  • Single and Double leg takedowns (Catching a kicking leg of the opponent and executing a takedown will not be considered as a single leg takedown.)
  • Clinching, holding or grabbing for any reason other than to immediately execute a legal technique. Inactive clinching will be split by the referee.
  • Suplexes or any other throwing techniques over the head
  • Throwing or spiking an opponent intentionally on their head or neck, or out of the fighting area
  • Timidity or Passivity, including but not limited to; avoiding contact with an opponent, failing to initiate legal techniques, intentionally or consistently dropping the mouthpiece or faking an injury
  • Holding the mitts of an opponent
  • Attacking an opponent on or during the break, while the opponent is under the care of the referee or after the bell has sounded ending the round
  • Flagrantly disregarding the instructions of the referee or any interference by the corner
  • Biting, spitting, clawing, pinching, twisting the flesh, hair-pulling, fish-hooking, gouging, putting a finger in an orifice, cut or laceration, small joint manipulation or any other “dirty tactics”
  • Engaging in any unsportsmanlike conduct, including but not limited to abusive language.
  • Applying any foreign substance to the hair or body to gain an advantage

Cautions, Warnings, Penalties and Injuries Resulting from a Foul

  • Referees may Caution, Warn, Penalize or Disqualify a fouling fighter.
  • Cautions may be given without interrupting the fighting action of the bout.
  • The intentional execution of any forbidden hand strikes and kicks will immediately be penalized with point deduction.
  • The unintentional execution of any forbidden hand strikes and kicks will be given an immediate verbal warning and on the next occurrence, it will be penalized with point deduction. To issue an official warning the referee will separate the fighters and speak directly to the athlete that is being warned.
  • To issue an official warning the referee should separate the fighters and speak directly to the athlete that he/she is warning.
  • If a point or points are to be deducted the referee should stop time and send the non-offending fighter to the opposite side of the pit. The referee should make certain that the judges and the commission supervisor fully understand the nature of the deduction.
  • If a fighter is to be disqualified, the referee should waive his hands above his head indicating the termination of the bout.
  • If a fighter is injured resulting from a foul, it will be handled according to the rules, regulations and policies of the presiding commission.

Types of Contest Results a) Knockout by:

  • When the Referee stops the contest (TKO)
  • When a self-inflicted injury or injury as a result of a legal maneuver is severe enough to terminate a bout (TKO)
  • When a fighter fails to demonstrate intelligent defense and places himself at unreasonable risk for imminent damage (TKO)
  • When a fighter is unable to enter the pit without assistance (TKO)
  • When a contestant has been rendered unconscious due to strikes or kicks (KO)

b) Decision via the scorecards, including:

  • Unanimous Decision:
  • When all three judges score the contest for the same contestant
  • Split Decision:
  • When two judges score the contest for one contestant and one judge scores for the opponent
  • Majority Decision:
  • When two judges score the contest for the same contestant and one judge scores a draw
  • Technical Decision:
  • If an injury from a foul ends the contest or a double KO occurs the presiding commission’s rules regarding technical decisions will be applied.

c) Draws If the regulation bout is scored a draw, one additional round will occur to determine a winner. If the result of the additional round remains a draw, the bout will be scored a draw.

  • Unanimous Draw
  • When all three judges score the contest a draw
  • Majority Draw
  • When two judges score the contest a draw
  • Split Draw
  • When one judge scores a draw and the other two judges score for in favor of different contestants
  • d) No contest
  • e) Disqualification
  • f) Forfeit
  • g) Technical Draw
  • h) No Decision

Note that the points above are general descriptions. Actual bout results will be determined according to the rules and regulations of the presiding commission. Extra Round (Sudden Victory)

  • If the judges’ final score result in a draw
  • If the fight is balanced out, the judges may indicate on the last round’s (third round in case of a non-title fight, fifth round in case of a title/championship fight) scorecard if they wish to have an extra round to determine the winner. To have an extra round at least two judges have to request the extra round.

Note : If the final score after the last round (third round in case of a regular fight, fifth round in case of a title/championship fight) is a Unanimous or Majority decision there will be no possibility for an extra round. In these two cases, there will be one additional Sudden Victory round, the result of which will determine the winner.

  1. If the sudden victory round is scored a draw then the official result will be a draw.
  2. Licensed Seconds The presiding commission will determine the number of seconds that will be licensed.
The chief second and cutman may/will enter the pit during the rest period between each round to address the needs of the fighter.

Overruling, Unwritten Rules and Commission Jurisdiction The above rules for Karate Combat will always be subordinate, and consequently may be revoked or modified depending on the applicable laws and/or ethical standards of the country and/or state where the event is organized, occurring under the supervision of an Athletic Commission, Sanctioning Organization or other approved Regulatory Body.

The authority to resolve any circumstances not specifically addressed in this document will be the domain of the presiding commission in consultation with the sanction organization and Karate Combat rules director. The Dangers of Cutting Weight and Dehydrating (based on the Association of Ringside Physicians) Unhealthy and dangerous weight loss practices continue to be a serious problem in combat sports.

It has been shown that excessive weight loss, rapid weight loss, and repeated cycling of weight gain/loss causes decreased performance, hormonal imbalance, decreased nutrition and increased injury risk. Other life-threatening problems associated with improper weight loss and dehydration include:

  • Decreased Muscle Strength and Endurance: Decreased blood flow to muscles makes them work less well.
  • Decreased Heart and Cardiovascular Function: The heart works harder and less efficiently.
  • Reduced Energy Utilization, Nutrient Exchange and Acidosis: With decreased blood flow to tissues, nutrients don’t get delivered, and the body’s waste products do not get removed as well. A buildup of acid occurs which changes cells’ functions in the body.
  • Heat Illness: This takes on four forms: heat cramps, heat syncope (loss of consciousness), heat exhaustion, and heat stroke (which may be fatal). Dehydration results in decreased blood flow to the skin and muscles. This is followed by decreased ability to regulate body temperature. The ability to sweat becomes impaired and core body temperature can rise. This increases the threat of all of these to poorly hydrated athletes doing strenuous workouts.
  • Decreased Kidney Function: Dehydration leads to decreased kidney blood flow and decreased kidney function. This contributes to the problems listed in the points here, in addition to decreased urine output, concentrated urine, and leakage of protein into the urine. (It is not known if these changes can result in permanent kidney damage.)
  • Electrolyte Problems: Decreased kidney function results in imbalances of electrolytes such as unhealthy increases in potassium and sodium.
  • Mood Swings and Mental Changes: All of the above contribute to increased mood swings, poor concentration and focus, disorientation and other mental changes.
  • Eye Trouble: Dehydration can cause blurred vision and dry eyes.
  • Increased Risk of Brain Injury: There are likely increased risks of brain bleeding and concussion.

Do not:

  • Don’t use extreme methods for making weight such as excessive heat methods (rubberized suits, steam rooms, saunas), excessive intense bouts of exercise, vomiting, laxatives and diuretics.
  • Don’t use dehydration as a mainstay of making weight. In addition to the above, it puts you at risk of improper rehydration techniques — when, in reality, proper rehydration takes several hours to days. (Many cases of intravenous fluids being used for rehydration after weigh-ins have been reported – this is a doping violation with several organizations.)

Do:

  • Commit to a year-round proper diet and training for proper weight control and body composition.
  • By maintaining your weight year-round near an appropriate competition weight and not competing in a weight class outside your appropriate weight class you will help avoid large swings in weight
  • Maintain a good state of hydration by drinking fluid throughout the day and staying hydrated during workouts.
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Follow nutritional programs that meet your needs for adequate amounts of calories from a balanced diet high in healthy carbohydrates, the minimum requirement of fat, and appropriate amounts of protein. : Karate Combat Rules And Regulations

Is karate a good sport?

Karate and other forms of martial arts can be really good for teens. Generally, the sport promotes self-discipline, builds strength, flexibility, and agility, and instills values of honor, hard work, and respect. Many programs teach confidence-building self-defense skills as well.

What are the illegal moves in karate?

Rules – NASKA • North American Sport Karate Association We do make the rules—and we follow them too. Section 1.01 COMPETITOR Each competitor must present him/herself to the referee suitably attired with proper uniform and equipment and physically prepared to compete.

If he/she is not prepared to compete as deemed by the center official, the competitor may be penalized for delay of time. Section 1.02 COMPETITOR RESPONSIBILITIES It is the responsibility of the competitor to know the rules and be ready for competition when called to do so. He/she must be suitably attired, weighed-in and at the appropriate ring when competition begins.

Three calls will be made for competition at ringside. If the competitor is not at his/her ring ready to compete when competition begins, he/she will not be able to compete (see delay of time rule). If a competitor leaves the ring after the competition begins and is not present when his/her name is called to compete, his/her name will be called three times at ringside.

If he/she is still not present to compete, he/she will be disqualified (see delay of time rule). Section 1.03 LEGAL AGE RULE All competitors have the option of competing in the same division all year long for rating purposes, by establishing a legal competition age for the year. The age a competitor is on June 30th of the current competition year is their legal competition age for that year.

They can compete all year at that age so he/she can earn rating points in one age division all year. A competitor can always compete in his/her chronological age if they chose. All adult Black Belt sparring competitors 30+ have the option to compete down in age.

  1. Example: Any 30+, 40+, 50+ and 60+ year old competitor can compete in any younger adult Black Belt Division.) A competitor cannot compete up in an age division.
  2. An adult competitor can choose to compete down in age but can only compete in 1 age group for Sparring, 1 age group for Weapons, 1 age group for Forms and 1 age group for Team Sparring.

If the competitor elects to compete in more than 1 age group / separate ages for Sparring, Forms or Weapons, they must be aware that divisions cannot be held for them to move from one age group to another. They will be subject for disqualified if they cannot make their divisions on time.

They should always check the tournament scheduling before committing to competing in more than one age group. Section 1.04 PROOF OF AGE RULE All competitors must have a proof of age document. If there is a legitimate reason to question a competitor’s age, he/she must present a proof of age (birth certificate, driver’s license, or other acceptable documents) to prove his/her age.

Page | 5 NASKA (North American Sport Karate Association) 600 Sherwood Rd, Shoreview, MN 55126 Section 1.05 RANK RULE A competitor must compete at the highest belt level they have earned in the martial arts. A competitor can never compete in a division of which he/she had not legally earned that rank.

  1. Once a competitor competes as a black belt legally, he/she must always compete as a black belt.
  2. A competitor can never compete in a lower belt division than the level of belt he/she has earned in the Martial Arts.
  3. Section 1.06 LATE ENTRIES If a competitor arrives late (the division is ready to start, but the 1st competitor has not started), the late entry must compete first, including seeds.

Once a division has started (the first competitor has started his/her form/weapon routine or the first divisional sparring match has started) no competitor/s can be added to that division. BE ON TIME! Only exception to this rule is the “Fairness Rule” at the end of this rules summary.

  • Late Entry Definition: a competitor arrives at the ring after the last call for the division has been made, the seeds selected, the shuffle has been made, the order of competition has been determined and the 1st competitor has not started.
  • Section 1.07 UNDER BLACK BELT RULES NASKA has guidelines for promoters to follow for the purpose of safety.

Some promoters will post the rules to be used in the UBB competition. This is not regulated by NASKA. NASKA also has a set of standard divisions promoters use for the purpose of ratings. NASKA is constantly revising these divisions for fairness and competitiveness.

  1. Please always contact the tournament promoter concerning Under Black Belt rules.
  2. Section 1.08 WEIGHING-IN It is mandatory for all adult sparring competitors – who are in weighed divisions – to weigh in before competition.
  3. Only one official weigh-in is required.
  4. All competitors must compete in his/her weight division.

A competitor cannot compete up or down in another weight division for which he/she has not made the proper weight. It is the responsibility of the tournament personnel to weigh and properly record the competitor’s weight. If a competitor is caught falsifying their weight, they will be disqualified.

  • If a competitor fails to weigh-in, prior to their division being called for competition to start, he/she is subject to the Delay of Time Penalty (see Delay of Time Penalty Rule).
  • It is the responsibility of the competitor to be officially weighed-in prior to their division.
  • Section 1.09 RING REQUIREMENTS The size of the fighting and forms adult black belt rings shall be approximately 20′ x 20′.

a) Starting lines should be marked approximately six feet apart in the middle of the ring. b) Additionally, each ring should be posted with a ring number visible to competitors, officials, and medical personnel from across the floor. c) All youth and under black belt adult rings can be a minimum of 16′ to a maximum of 20′.

Section 1.10 FAIRNESS RULE If a question arises that is not completely covered by this rule book, the official rules arbitrator may at his/her discretion, overrule, modify or change a delineated rule if he/she believes that enforcing such a rule would result in an inherent unfair outcome to a competitor.

However, the rules arbitrator should overrule, modify, or change a delineated rule only in extreme cases. Section 1.11 DIVISIONAL, TOURNAMENT, AND ORGANIZATIONAL DISQUALIFICATION These disqualifications go from least severe to the most severe. The severity of the infraction is the basis of which disqualification is warranted.

  • What is warranted is voted upon by the NASKA Board of Directors.
  • Play by the rules and show good sportsmanship at all times.
  • Section 2.01 UNIFORM All competitors must wear a complete (top and bottom) traditional or professional sport karate (Kung Fu, Tae Kwon Do, etc.) uniform in a good state of repair.

The appropriate color belt or sash must be worn in competition. a) Sparring: All sparring uniforms must have sleeves that reach at least to the middle of the biceps. No T-shirts, sweats, tank tops or unapproved shoes are allowed in the sparring divisions (see sparring foot pads).

b) Forms & Weapons: T-shirts, tank tops and sweatshirts are allowed in forms if they are part of the competitor’s official school uniform. Uniforms in the forms and weapons divisions are allowed more liberties because a form routine is not one-on-one competition where the uniform could cause a decisive disadvantage or advantage to a competitor.

Removal of the uniform top is allowed if the removal is considered relevant to the artistic expression or safety of the competitor. Shoes may be worn in forms competition if they do not damage or mark the competition floor. Section 2.02 REQUIRED AND RECOMMENDED SAFETY EQUIPMENT NASKA approved headgear; hand and foot pads, mouthpieces, groin cups (for male competitors only) and chest guards & face shields (for all competitors 17-year-old and younger) are mandatory for all competitors in sparring divisions.

  • The competitor’s equipment will be checked and if it is deemed unsafe or does not fit properly, he/she will be asked to change the equipment before he/she can compete.
  • Insufficiently padded gloves, foot, chest and head hear will not be allowed.
  • Equipment must be in a good state of repair and must be free of heavy taping, tears or any other repairs that may cause injury.

If a competitor is missing required equipment or the equipment does not meet NASKA requirements, as it is deemed unsafe, prior to their division being called for competition, he/she is subject to the Delay of Time Penalty and may be disqualified, it is the responsibility of the competitors to have the proper equipment.

  • The tournament’s official rules arbitrator ultimately determines the approval or denial of the equipment.
  • Shin pads, elbow pads and rib/chest guards are highly recommended for additional safety to all sparring competitors in all divisions.
  • A) Hand Pads: A soft padded surface must cover the fingers, wrist and any striking surface of the hand.

b) Foot Pads: A soft padded surface must cover the instep, sides, toes, ankle and back of the heel of the foot. The bottom of the foot does not have to be padded. (Note – NASKA has approved the use of “Ringstar” or Ringstar Equivalent sparring shoes in all sparring divisions, with the same stipulations placed on other approved sparring gear.) c) Head Gear: The front, sides and back of the head must be covered by a soft padded surface.

  • In addition to the head gear, a face shield is required for all competitors 17 yrs. & under.
  • D) Chest Guard: All 17 and younger competitors must wear an approved chest protector in sparring.
  • The chest guard must sufficiently cover the abdomen and upper chest such that the sternum is completely protected.

Rib guards that cover only the abdomen area are not approved chest guards. e) Mouthpiece: A properly fitted mouthpiece is required Section 3.01 ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES Each ring should have a Center Official, two to four Judges, and a Timekeeper/Scorekeeper.

  • b) The Center Official make all final decisions on penalty points and warnings (except for disqualifications) but can consult judges before making their decisions.
  • c) The majority vote of the judges and referee determines a scoring point and/or a competitor’s disqualification.
  • Section 3.02 CENTER REFEREE (CENTER OFFICIAL)

The Center Official is selected on his/ her experience and knowledge of the rules and is thoroughly versed on the rules and order of competition. He/she promotes the safety of the competitors, enforces the rules and ensures fair play. To this end, the Center Official:

  1. a) starts and stops the match;
  2. b) award points;
  3. c) makes penalty decisions;
  4. d) administrates the voting of the other judges;
  5. e) communicates clearly with the scorekeeper and timekeeper; and
  6. f) announces the winner of each match.
  7. Section 3.03 ADDED RESPONSIBILITIES TO THE CENTER OFFICIAL:
  8. The Center Official also maintains responsibility for the following:
  9. a) Match starts and ends only with his/her command (not the command of the timekeeper);
  10. b) Has final decision on any disputes on score;
  11. c) Has the power to issue warnings and award penalty points without a majority decision:
  12. d) Can overrule a majority call only to issue a warning or a penalty point:
  13. e) Automatically has power to disqualify a competitor who receives (3) penalty points; and

f) Has power to issue time-outs. A competitor can ask for a time-out, but it is the determination of the center official to issue one. NOTE – The disqualification of a competitor, where disqualification is not automatic, is determined only by a majority vote of the judges.

  • Section 3.04 NUMBER OF OFFICIALS 2 or 4 NASKA judges and one NASKA center official are recommended in all weapons, forms, and sparring divisions (4 or 6 judges and 1center official are allowed in weapons and forms grand championships).
  • If only two judges and one center official are used in the weapon and form divisions, the Maximum Deviation Rule (See Article VII) will be used in all form and weapon divisions.

Section 3.05 REMOVAL OF OFFICIALS If a competitor feels that an official should be removed from a form or weapon division for good reason He/she must file a protest before the division begins. If a competitor feels that an official should be removed from a sparring division, he/she may file a protest at any time.

  • Section 3.06 PROTEST
  • A competitor has the right to protest an infraction of the rules or if a possible mistake was made (not a judgment call).
  • a) If a competitor wishes to protest, he/she should first let the referee know he/she believes there has been an infraction of the rules or a mistake has been made.
  • b) The referee will summon the arbitrator to the ring (if the referee cannot properly settle the protest to the player’s satisfaction) to render a decision.
  • c) All protests must be made in an orderly, proper and sportsmanlike manner.
  • d) All protests must be made immediately.
  • e) Protests are not allowed once competition has resumed (after the fact protest).
  • f) A competitor may be penalized or even disqualified if he/she is protesting improperly or without proper cause.
  • Section 3.07 CALLS AN OFFICIAL MAY MAKE

When the referee believes there has been a significant exchange of techniques, or when signaled to do so by a corner a judge, he/she shall call out the word, “STOP!” in a loud voice. The referee shall wait until the competitor’s return to their starting marks and addresses the judges by saying “JUDGES CALL!” All judges and the center referee cast their votes simultaneously and assertively in the following manner.

A) Judge Sees a Point – He/she should hold up both colors or hold up one arm, if colors are not being used. At the same time, he/she yells out the word “CALL!” in a loud, clear voice to let the referee know he/she has a call. b) Point Calling – When signaled by the referee (referee says the competitor who scores the point.

If a competitor scores a two-point kick, the officials should hold up or point with two fingers (index and middle fingers). If only one point is being called, the “Judges Call” in a loud clear voice) a judge raises the appropriate color (red or white usually) if colors are being used or points to judge should point with only one finger (Index finger).

  1. C) No Point Scored – An official crosses his/her wrist at waist level or holds both colors down to indicate that he/she believes that a point was not scored.
  2. D) Did Not See If A Point Was Scored – The officials hold his/her hand over his/her eyes indicating that he/she could not see whether a point was scored or not.

Indicates the official was not in position to see if a point scored. (When using this signal, it has the same effect as saying “no point”, but it indicates to the referee, competitors and fans the reason why you are not calling the point). e) Clash – Officials make a motion as though they are hitting both fists together, indicating that both competitors scored at the same time.

f) Penalty – The judge waves the color of the offending competitor in a circular motion. If no colors are used the judge waves the hand and arm in a circular motion while pointing at the offending competitor. g) Disqualification – A disqualification vote is taken separately from any other vote. When a disqualification vote is asked for, the center official will say, “JUDGES CALL”.

The judges will then hold the color or point to the competitor who is to be disqualified. If the judge does not feel the competitor should be disqualified, he/she crosses his/her wrist or holds both colors down at waist level. Section 3.08 LATE CALLS All officials should make their calls at the same time.

If, in the opinion of the center official, the corner judges are making a late call intentionally, the center official can disqualify the call and/or judge (noise not allowing the judges to hear the referee and the honest mistake of raising the wrong color or pointing at the wrong competitor should be taken into consideration not to disqualify the call or judge).

(See Also Article X – Black Belt Team Sparring) Section 4.01 ORDER OF COMPETITION Once the final call for the sparring division is made at ringside and the seeds have been taken out (See Seeding Rules) the division is ready to be set up. The competition cards should be collected and counted (if competition cards are not used, count the competitors) to see if byes are needed.

  1. If byes are needed, they will be picked randomly (seeds may have first priority for byes – See Seeding Rules).
  2. A) Competitors cannot pick whom they want or do not want to fight.
  3. B) Matches should always be selected by random, but certain allowances may be given to competitors from the same school or team that are matched up in the first round of competition.

They may be separated randomly from each other in the first round if possible.

  1. c) In the 10 and above Black Belt youth divisions, the competitors, boys and girls should be lined up by height (smallest to the tallest) and split into tall and short divisions.
  2. d) Promoters may elect to split or not split UBB Boys and / or Girls into short and tall divisions.
  3. e) Determining tall and short divisions is for safety reasons, not just to split the division equally.
  4. f) A true break in size should be found to determine the taller competitors from the shorter competitors.
  5. g) Once the tall and short divisions are determined by height, determine who fights whom by random draw.
  6. h) Consideration should be given to competitors who are from the same school or team that have been drawn to fight each other in the first round.
  7. i) The winner of the small and tall divisions will compete in a single round 2-minute match to determine the overall champion for that age group and gender.
  8. Section 4.02 LENGTH OF MATCH
  9. The length of a match will be two minutes running-time unless a competitor is seven points ahead (Seven Point Spread Rule) before time has expired.
  10. a) If a match is tied at the end of two minutes, a sudden victory (first person to score a point) overtime period will determine the match.
  11. b) At the 1 minute 45 second mark of a sparring match, the timekeeper will shout out “FIFTEEN SECONDS”.
  12. c) All Divisional Grand Championship matches are 1 two-minute round but a competitor must win by 2 points.
  13. d) Overall Grand Championship matches are two, two-minute rounds.

Section 4.03 WHAT IS A SPARRING POINT? A point is a sport karate technique that is scored by a competitor in-bounds and up-right (not considered down) without time being called that strikes a competitor with the allowable amount of focused touch contact and focused control to a legal target area.

  • A) Focused Touch Contact: the legal amount of contact allowed to certain scoring areas.
  • B) Focused Control: an amount of controlled force that would have incapacitated the opponent, at least momentarily, if the technique had not been controlled.
  • Therefore, only sport karate techniques that would have incapacitated the opponent, at least momentarily, if the technique had not been controlled, are considered points.

(Ex. A front hand to the body that does not have “focused control” is not considered a proper sport karate scoring technique.)

  • Section 4.04 GENERAL RULES
  • a) All regular NASKA Light touch point calling rules will apply.
  • b) Out of Bounds, falling down or excessive running (as determined by the head official) around the ring will be considered an attempt to avoid competition and the other competitor will be awarded a point.

c) A competitor is considered out of bound when they have both feet off the sparring area (mat). If the competitor is out of bounds without being kicked out or physically pushed out of bounds, their opponent will receive 1 point. (See also Section 4.18) d) If a competitor goes out of bounds while the other competitor is kicking or punching, near the competitor WITHOUT actually touching the competitor, the competitor will be considered leaving the sparring area to avoid competition and the other competitor will receive a point.

A fighter must stay engaged in the match if he goes at of bounds not to be penalized. e) If the out-of-bound competitor is scored on, with a legal technique, before the center official calls STOP, then the in-bounds competitor can receive a score for the technique and the penalty point from the other competitor going out of bounds to avoid fighting.

f) If a fighter touches the ground / mat with, with any part of their body, except their feet or 1 hand, they are considered down. g) A point cannot be scored by a down competitor and a downed competitor cannot be score on. If an upright competitor strikes a down competition they can be penalized.

  1. h) A competitor who leaves their feet while in-bounds, must land with at least one foot in-bounds to score a point.
  2. Section 4.05 POINT VALUES AND WINNER DETERMINATION
  3. a) All legal hand techniques that score will be awarded one (1) point.
  4. b) All legal kicking techniques that score will be awarded two (2) points.
  5. c) All jump spinning kicks to the head will be awarded (3) points.
  6. d) All penalty points will be awarded one (1) point.
  7. e) The competitor who is ahead by 7 points (7 point spread rule) before the end of the two-minute time period is automatically declared the winner or whoever is ahead at the end of the two minutes is declared the winner.
  8. f) All Divisional grand championship matches have a two-minute running time with a 10 Point Spread Rule, but must be won by 2 points.
  9. g) All Black Belt Grand Championship and Overall Grand Championship matches, competitors must win by two points.
  10. Section 4.06 MAJORITY OF VOTES

Points are awarded by a majority vote of all judges. The majority of judges do not have to agree on the same technique being scored, only that a point was scored. A majority of the judges calling the point must call a two (2)-point kick before two points can be awarded. Otherwise only one point is awarded,

  • Section 4.07 LEGAL, ILLEGAL, AND NON-TARGET AREAS
  • a) Legal Target Areas: Entire head and face, ribs, chest, abdomen, collarbone and kidneys.
  • b) Illegal Target Areas: Spine, back of neck, throat, sides of the neck, groin, legs, knees and back.
  • c) Non-Target Areas: Hips, shoulders, buttocks, arms, and feet.
  • Section 4.08 LEGAL & ILLEGAL TECHNIQUES
  • a) LEGAL TECHNIQUES are all controlled sport karate techniques, except those listed as illegal.
  • b) ILLEGAL TECHNIQUES: Head butts, hair pulls, bites, scratches, elbows, knees, eye attacks of any kind, take downs on a hard surface floor, ground fighting on a hard surface, any stomps or kicks to the head of a downed competitor, slapping, grabbing for more than one second, uncontrolled blind techniques, any uncontrolled throws, takedowns or sweeps and any other uncontrolled dangerous techniques that are deemed unsafe in sport karate.
  • Section 4.09 GRABBING

A competitor may grab the uniform top of his/her opponent in an attempt to score with a sport karate technique for only one second (immediately), after which time he/she must release the uniform. Likewise, the uniform pants may be grabbed for one second to an upright opponent in an attempt to score.

  1. Section 4.10 SWEEPS, TAKEDOWNS, AND GROUND FIGHTING
  2. Sweeps are not meant to take down an opponent, but only to obstruct the balance so as to follow up with a sport karate technique and can only be executed to the back of the front leg at mid-calf or below.
  3. a) A sweep must be deemed a proper sweep and not a kick, to be legal.
  4. b) Controlled Takedowns and sweeps that are meant to take down an opponent are not allowed.
  5. c) A point is awarded only when the legal sweep or takedown is followed up effectively legally and immediately with an appropriate sport karate technique.
  6. Section 4.11 LIGHT TOUCH CONTACT

Light Touch Contact means there is no penetration or visible movement of the competitor because of the contact. Light touch is required to all legal target areas in all black belt sparring divisions. The face shield of a headgear along with the headgear is a legal target area.

Section 4.12 MODERATE TOUCH CONTACT Moderate Touch Contact is defined as slight penetration or slight target movement. Moderate touch contact may be made to all legal target areas except the headgear, face shield and face. Section 4.13 WARNINGS AND PENALTIES a) NO WARNINGS are issued in NASKA Black Belt sparring.

Penalty points are issued immediately for breaking the rules. b) A penalty point will be issues if a competitor, as determined by the center official: i. Goes out of bounds to avoid competition; ii. Falls down to avoid competition; iii. Runs around the ring to avoid competition; iv.

  • Stalling and/or not attempting to engage the other competitor; v.
  • Excessive contact, as deemed by the center official; vi.
  • Pushing a competitor out of bound, as deemed by the center official; vii.
  • A coach stands up or leaves the coach’s chair during the match; viii.
  • A competitor arrives at the ring without the proper equipment; ix.

A sparring match is ready to start and the competitor is delaying his / her entry in the ring; x. Form/Weapons competitor delays entering the ring xi. Competitor refuses to leave the immediate sparring area and additional penalty point may be issued; xii.

Late strikes after call to stop; (xiii) Retaliation strike from a competitor; (xiv) Competitor’s equipment is incorrectly fitted or properly secured and continues to fall off or requires adjustments; or (xv) A competitor purposely removes their equipment. c) Once a competitor receive 3 penalty points they are disqualified.

If a penalty is called on one or both competitors, the penalty point(s) must be issued to the competitor(s). This ensures the penalties are counted to determine an automatic disqualification. For example; both competitor continue to spar after STOP is called.

The Center Official calls a penalty on both competitors, one-point penalty should be issued to both competitors. Section 4.14 DELAY OF TIME PENALTY In Under Black Belts one (1) warning may be issued to the competitor (verify with promoter if Black Belts and UBB have the same rules.) A penalty point will be issued for each minute the competitor is not properly ready to compete.

Upon 3 penalty points the offending competitor will be disqualified. At the discretion of the center official, a penalty point may be issued immediately, if the center official believes the competitor is delaying without a valid reason (equipment as an example).

  1. Section 4.15 OTHER PENALTY RULES: A competitor cannot be penalized and still receive a point on the same call.
  2. A competitor can receive a point for a proper technique and another point from a penalty call against his/her competitor.
  3. If, in the opinion of the referee and/or the medical personnel, a competitor cannot continue because of an injury caused by an illegal penalized attack executed by his/her competitor, the offending competitor shall be automatically disqualified.

The injured competitor cannot continue to compete. Section 4.16 OTHER CAUSES FOR PENALIZATION Attacking illegal and non-target areas, using illegal techniques, running out of the ring to avoid fighting, falling to the floor to avoid fighting, continuing after being ordered to stop, excessive stalling, blind, negligent or reckless attacks, uncontrolled techniques, showing unsportsmanlike behavior by the competitor, his/her coaches, friends, etc., excessive contact, and delay of time are just some examples of possible penalization.

  • See new Limiting Contact between Officials and Competitors for other possible penalizations.) Section 4.17 DISQUALIFICATION Requires a majority vote by all officials, unless it is an automatic disqualification.
  • A) Non-Competing Penalty: If, in the majority opinion of the officials, it is considered that one or both competitors are not making an obvious attempt to compete in the sparring match in the true spirit of competition, one or both competitors will be warned and if it continues, will be disqualified.

b) Wrong Division: If any competitor competes in a division he/she does not qualify to compete in due to age, weight, rank, gender, style, etc., he/she will be disqualified. Section 4.18 OUT-OF-BOUNDS A competitor is out-of-bounds as soon as he/she does not have at least one foot touching inside or on the boundary line.

  1. An out of bounds competitor cannot score a point while out of bounds.
  2. In bounds competitor, can score on an out of bounds competitor if the center referee has not called stop.
  3. Section 4.19 COACHING The luxury of having a coach is something that most competitors do not have access to.
  4. Therefore, it sometimes can become an unfair advantage over a competitor who does not have a coach.

The rules are made and enforced so no one competitor has an advantage or disadvantage over another competitor. Therefore, coaching is allowed but only under the following guidelines: a) A Coach is defined as anyone who is trying to help one competitor in anyway.

A coach could be but is not limited to a friend, parent, teammate, or an official coach. b) Never, at any time, can a coach enter the ring without the referee’s permission; c) No abusive, violent, unsportsmanlike or overzealous coaching; d) Coaches cannot ask for a time out unless they are protesting a rules violation (only the competitor may ask for a time out).

A flag or other tool will be provided, at the coach’s chair, to throw into the ring to call for a judgement or protest. However, if the center official has ruled a judge’s call was late and therefore not considered, arbitration cannot be requested. e) Coaches can never, at any time, interfere with the proper running of the ring or the decisions of the judges.

  • The center official can issue a penalty point to a competitor for each time his/her coach is interfering with a match or disrupting fair play between contestants.
  • A referee can ask for a disqualification of a contest, but requires a majority vote of all judges.
  • F) If a coach’s chair is provided, the coach must stay in the chair during the match.

A coach’s player can be penalized during a match if they leave the chair without permission of the head judge. The head judge determines the severity of the penalty base on the coach’s conduct. Section 4.20 INJURED COMPETITOR (a) The medic has the final determination is a competitor may NOT continue, with NO exceptions.

  1. B) If a competitor is injured not due to a penalty they are allowed 4 minutes to determine if they can continue, the time starts immediately.
  2. The time may be extended two additional minutes, once the medic reaches the competitor.
  3. It is the center official’s responsibility to communicate with the medic and determine if additional time will be allowed.

The center official must then inform the scorekeeper who is keeping up with the time of the delay. A medic can always request an extension time to properly determine if the competitor can continue. The maximum time that can be allocated to determine if a competitor can continue is 8 minutes.

  1. If the medic requests an extended length of time due to an injury and is officially allowed, it is recommended, if possible, to move to the next match while the injured competitor is recuperating.
  2. The timekeeper must record the score and time remaining to properly restart the match.
  3. C) If it is determined the injured competitor cannot continue, due to a penalty as determined by center referee and judges the uninjured competitor is disqualified.

(d) If the competitor cannot continue due to a penalty, the injured competitor will receive 7 points as a result of the disqualification. The competitor who committed the violation will get 0 points. (e) If a competitor cannot continue because of an injury where there is no penalty call, the uninjured competitor will receive a 7-point spread.

F) If something happens in any NASKA sparring competition that cannot be answered by the rules stated, the “NASKA Fairness Rule” will come into play. As an example – the failure of a tournament medic to arrive prior, to the expiration of the 4-minute rule. Section 4.21 EXCESSIVE INJURIES On a third request for an injury timeout, the competitor will NOT be allowed to continue.

The Referee and Judges will follow normal protocol to see if the injury was the results of an illegal technique. Section 4.22 Timeout’s A request to stop the time can only be requested by the competitor in the ring. A coach may NOT request the timeout and can be penalized if he or she: – Leave the coach’s chair – Enter the ring; or – Uses profanity The center official, as their discretion, may allow the time out or elect to disregard the request.

  1. A flag or other tool will be provided, at the coach’s chair, to throw into the ring to call for a judgement or protest.
  2. However, if the center official has ruled a judge’s call was late and therefore not considered, arbitration cannot be requested.
  3. Section 4.23 YOUTH OPEN WEIGHT DIVISIONS (a) Only offered for Black Belts youth competitors; (b) Boys and Girls will be separated; (c) Division will not be separated into small and tall; (d) Divisions offered are 11 and under, 12 to 14, and 15 to 17; (e) Requires standard Youth equipment, contact levels and seeding; and (f) Order of competitors will be randomly selected; however, consideration will be given to competitors from the same team or same physical school.

Section 5.01 MAXIMUM DEVIATION RULE (See also Article VII) Since the high and low scores are not dropped when three officials are used in forms and weapons, the Maximum Deviation Rule (See Article VII) limits the impact of a single judge’s score to control with his/her high or low score the outcome of placement.

  • The judge’s score that is between the other two judges scores (middle score) is considered the middle score.
  • Once that score has been determined, the other two judges cannot be higher or lower than,02 points of that middle score.
  • If their score is higher or lower than,02, they must adjust their score up or down accordingly to that,02 maximum deviation.

See complete Maximum Deviation Rule (See Article VII) for more details. Section 5.02 DELAY OF TIME PENALTY A,01 point, per judge, will be deducted from the offending competitor’s final score each minute the competitor is not ready to compete. If a competitor is still not ready to compete after 3 minutes, he/she will be disqualified.

Section 5.03 TIME LIMIT Time starts with the competitor first step, in the ring. Competitors have used two initial launch points; 1) the corner of the ring; or 2) just outside of the corner. In either case, once a competitor takes their first step time will start. Should a competitor delay their start, the following will occur: a) The Center Referee shall issue a First Verbal Warning to the Competitor by stating: “PLEASE BEGIN YOUR PERFORMANCE.” b) If Competitor fails to comply with the Center Official’s First Verbal Warning, a Second Verbal Warning shall be given by the Center Official stating: “SECOND WARNING, PLEASE BEGIN YOUR PERFORMANCE.” A Second Verbal Warning may result in a,01 deduction, per judge.

c) All Referees must reach a unanimous decision that the Competitor’s failure to enter the Competition Ring unreasonably delayed his/her performance prior to any penalty being assessed. Each divisional form or weapon routine must be three (3) minutes or less.

  1. Four (4) minutes is allowed for each form or weapon routine in the Night Time Finals.
  2. Each team form and/or demo routine as a four (4) minutes time limit.
  3. Any competitor, team form or team demo that goes over the allowed time limit is automatically disqualified.
  4. At the 2 minute 45 second mark (3 minutes 45 seconds for overall grands, Demos, Team Forms and Team Weapons) of a competitor’s form, the timekeeper will shout out “FIFTEEN SECONDS”.
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Section 5.04 ORDER OF COMPETITION Once the final call for the form and weapon divisions has been made at ring side and the divisional seeds have been taken out (see seeding rules) the competition cards will be collected and shuffled thoroughly. The competitor cards will then be drawn randomly for the order of competition.

  • As per the Relative Ranking Rule the judges will look at all the competitors before they give their final scores.
  • This rule allows judges to adjust their scores if they feel other competitors that come later are better or worse than the competitors who came first (See Relative Ranking Rule Sheet).
  • If a competitor arrives late (the division is ready to start, but the 1st competitor has not started), the late entry must compete first, including seeds; refer to Section 1.06 – Late Entry.

Section 5.05 SCORING RANGES OF FORMS AND WEAPONS The Scoring range should always be discussed by the center referee and judges before the division starts. a) TIES: If there is a tie for 1st thru 4th place, the majority of the judge’s scores determine the winner.

If there is not a majority of judges for one competitor and one judge or more gave the same score for the tied competitor, the judge that gave the same scores must be asked to make a decision and break the tie. b) All judges must make scoring decisions by giving different scores to the competitors. c) Ties for 5th through 8th place are never broken.

They will remain tied and all will receive points and awards. If there is a tie and there is not a majority judge’s decision and no judge gave the same score to any one competitor, the tied competitors will compete again and be scored again. Section 5.06 DROPPING A WEAPON If a competitor drops his/her weapon during the eliminations, they will not be scored and will be disqualified.

  • Section 5.07 ALTERING A WEAPON
  • It is the intent, of this rule, to enforce the use of any weapon in its original design, functionally, and capabilities, Alternating the weapon(s) in any matter, including but not limiting to the use of magnetic weapons, will be deeded as altering the weapon and the competitor scores may be lower.
  • Section 5.08 WEAPONS / FORMS PENALTY

A weapon(s) or any portion of a weapon should not exceed the boundary of the ring, including an imaginary line that goes vertically from the boundary floor line upward. Further, a competitor (weapons and forms competitors) should not exceed the imaginary line.

Should the judges see a weapon / competitor exceed the imaginary barrier, the competitor score can be downgrade or the competitor can be disqualified with a majority of the judges agreeing on the disqualification. The intent of this rule is the safety of competitors, spectators and the judges; also, known as group.

It is not intended to be applied unilaterally; rather in situations where the exceeding of the imaginary boundary could provide a risk to any of the group. For example, the weapon / competitor exceeds the boundary: – The weapon / competitor goes between or over the groups body or head; or – The weapons / competitor hits anyone, in the group, who is outside of the ring.

  1. Penalty – Striking / hitting anyone within the group – disqualification – All other penalties –,05 deduction by each judge.
  2. Section 5.09 STARTING A FORM OVER If a competitor starts his/her form over because of a memory lapse or any other reason due to his/her own negligence, he/she may perform the form again.

a) The officials will score as though there was not a mistake, but the center referee will instruct the judges to subtract,05 points from the competitor’s final score.

  1. b) The three-minute time limit will start over.
  2. c) A competitor can only start over one time for scoring.
  3. d) If a competitor has to start over, not due to his/her negligence, he/she will not be penalized on the start over.
  4. Section 5.10 TIE-BREAKER PROCESS

The process for breaking ties follows the same order regardless of the number of judges used for the division or the type of division (eliminations, runoffs, grands). The methodology always follows this order: 1) Majority of judges – this is the majority of the total number of judges in the division; not based on score but rather on who the judge placed higher (most ties can be broken using this rule) 2) Total score – this is the adding back of scores dropped when using five or seven judges and totaling the total score (not applicable to divisions with only 3 judges) 3) Re-run the tied competitors – the re-run would only include the tied competitors who remain tied after applying rules one and two The following information will provide additional details and examples as well as explaining how automated/electronic scoring systems are utilized.

Calculation of Scores Judges must score every division using the NASKA scoring system even if there are only 2 competitors or teams. The “pointing technique” is no longer allowed to eliminate potential confusion as to which competitor or team one or more judges are selecting. Divisions with five or seven judges: In scoring of competitors with Five or Seven judges, the high and low scores are dropped before totaling the remaining scores.

For example; a competitor received a 9.97, 9.99, 9.97, 9.98 and 9.99. One of the 9.97’s and one of the 9.99’s will be dropped (not counted) and the competitor score will be 29.94 (or 24 totaling only the last digit). This is done for all competitors to determine final placing.

  1. Maximum Deviation Rule is not used with 5 or 7 judges.
  2. Divisions with three judges: All three judge’s scores are totaled to arrive at the competitor’s total score.
  3. However, the Maximum Deviation Rule (See Article VII) is applied so that outlying scores are limited.
  4. The Maximum Deviation Rule (See Article VII) requires that scores must be within,02 of the middle score and it is only used with 3 judge panels.

This is done for all competitors to determine final placing. Tied Scores If a tie exists with 2 or more competitors, then the methodology listed above will be applied. The number of judges in the ring will determine how the tie breaking methodology will be utilized.

The calculation will change based on the number of judges, but in all cases the tie breaking methodology will be followed to determine the winner. Where a computer system is used, the methodology will be automated. Once the methods to break the ties are established then the steps necessary for each level, eliminations, runoff and overall grands will be defined below.

The methods are: – Majority of the judge’s. This is always the first method that will be performed to break a tie. In this process, each judge’s score will be compared to determine the number of judges that gave the highest score to each tied competitor.

For example: o Judge 1 gave competitor A 9.99 and competitor B 9.98 – competitor A gets 1 point o Judge 2 gave competitor A 9.99 and competitor B 9.98 – competitor A gets 1 point o Judge 3 gave competitor A 9.97 and competitor B 9.99 – competitor B gets 1 point The overall score is tied, but competitor A wins on two out of the three judges scores and thus has 2 points to 1 point for competitor B; competitor A gets the win.

– Judge Determines the Winner. This occurs when the electronic/automated system is NOT being used and there is a tie when a judge gave the same score to the tied competitors. The judge who gave the same score must select a winner. If the judge had to manually adjust his or her score due to the Maximum Deviation Rule (See Article VII), then the judge must select the winner based on the unadjusted score.

If the judge gave the same score to the two tied competitors, not as a result of the Maximum Deviation Rule (See Article VII), then he or she must select the winner. For example: o Judge 1 gave competitor A 9.99 and competitor B 9.98 – competitor A gets 1 point o Judge 2 gave competitor A 9.98 and competitor B 9.99 – competitor B gets 1 point o Judge 3 gave competitor A 9.96 and competitor B 9.96.

Judge 3 must select the competitor who they believe did the best form or weapon routine and who they select will be the winner. Total Score. This tiebreaker format is used with 5 or 7 judges and is the second method applied in the tie-breaker methodology.

  • This step is only applied if the tie could not be broken using the majority of the judges.
  • In this process the high and low scores (that were dropped) are added back in and will be used to total the overall score of each tied competitor.
  • Example: Judge 1 Judge 2 Judge 3 Judge 4 Judge 5 Competitor A 9.99 9.97 9.98 9.99 9.96 Competitor B 9.98 9.99 9.97 9.96 9.99 Competitor C 9.97 9.98 9.99 9.98 9.98 The calculation of scoring rules is applied and competitor A has a score of 29.94 (24) having dropped Judge 1 and Judge 5 scores.

Competitor B has a score of 29.94 (24) having dropped Judge 2 and Judge 4 scores. Competitor C has a score of 29.94 (24) having dropped Judge 3 and Judge 1. We first apply tie breaking methodology 1 which is the majority of judges. In this example, Judge 1 and Judge 4 gave the highest score to Competitor A; Judge 2 and Judge 5 gave their highest score to competitor B; and Judge 3 have the highest score to Competitor C.

  1. The majority of judge’s rule cannot break the tie so we must apply tie breaking methodology two which is sum of the judges scores.
  2. For competitor A we add back Judge 1 and Judge 5 and calculate a total score of 49.89 (39); competitor B we add back Judge 2 and Judge 4 and calculate a total score of 49.89 (39); and for competitor C we add back Judge 1 and Judge 3 and calculate a total score of 49.90 (40).

Competitor C’s overall score is higher and is the winner. The following summarizes the methodology that will be used, with the initial total score is a tied score and is based on the number of judges. Three Judges: 1. Majority of the judge’s 2. Judges determine the winner 3.

Re-run the tied competitors Five or Seven judges: Breaking a tie(s) with 5 or 7 judges will require the dropped judges score (low and high score) are included to break the tie(s).1. Majority of all judge’s 2. Judges determine the winner (breaks ties – if same score given to 1 or more competitors) 3. Total score of all the judges 4.

Re-run the tied competitors Section 6.01 RELATIVE RANKING RULE The Relative Ranking Rule has replaced the old “score-as-you-go” system in all divisions at all NASKA tournaments. Since all competitors run their forms before anyone is scored, this system eliminates the possible disadvantage early-running competitors were subject to, and the scoring advantage last-running seeds may have enjoyed.

In addition, it prevents judges from getting “boxed-in” by giving scores too high early on, and eliminates “scoring creep” where judges who starts with very low scores gradually raises his/her scores as the divisions progresses. Section 6.02 HOW IT WORKS For the Relative Ranking Rule to operate properly, all judges must use the scoring worksheets provided in the ring boxes.

As each competitor runs their form, they are given a place number relative to the competitor who has already run. (For example, each judge gives the first competitor up a “1” next to his/her name on the worksheet.) The next competitor gets a “2” if their form isn’t as good; or if their form is better, they get a “1” and the first competitor get his “1” changed to a “2”.

The third competitor then gets a number that grades his form relative to the first two, and so on down the division. When all competitors have run, each judge’s Worksheet will have all the competitor’s names listed in the order they ran, but with numbers next to their names that reflects their place relative to one another.

EXAMPLE IF FOUR COMPETITORS ARE IN DIVISION JOHN DOE II 9.98 2nd BOB SMITH III 9.96 3rd KEN BLACK I 9.99 1st LARRY JAY IIII 9.95 4th The Center Judge will then allow up to two minutes for the judges to assign decimal scores to each competitor based on their relative ranking.

  1. Each judge decides how high to score his number “1” competitor – usually a 9.99 or 9.98 in the black belt divisions – and assigns that score to the top competitor.
  2. The number “2” competitor will be scored one-hundredth lower at 9.98 or 9.97 (or even lower if the judge feels there was a great gap between the number “1” and number “2” competitors).

Number “3” will get a score at least one-hundredth lower than number “2, and number “4” will get a score at least one-hundredth lower than number “3”. This is done until all the competitors are ranked relative to each other. None of the top four competitors ever receives the same score, and the top four scores a judge gives are only given once.

A judge may give the same score to competitors he/she has ranked as “5” or lower, though it is discouraged unless there are many competitors in the division and giving incrementally lower scores would take the lowerranked competitors to scores that were undeservedly low. (Judges may prefer to use slash marks rather than numbers to rank each competitor: I, II, III, IIII and so on.

By using this method, you do not have to mark out or erase as often, you only add slashes.) Once all judges are ready, the Center Judge will have each competitor step forward as his or her scores are announced, using the Maximum Deviation Rule. Divisions with three officials will use the Maximum Deviation Rule.

Since high and low scores are not dropped when three officials are used, the Maximum Deviation Rule has a similar effect of limiting the impact of a judge’s score that is significantly higher or lower than the other judge’s scores. This prevents a single score from being so high or so low that it controls the placing order.

When a form or other performance is ready to be scored, the center official will say “Ready”, then, “Check”, at which point the three judges show their score to each other only (not to the competitors or spectators). The center official will then look at the 3 scores to determine which one is the middle score (for example, a 9.92, 9.96 and a 9.95 – the 9.95 is the middle score.

  1. The other 2 scores must be,02 from the middle score.
  2. So, in the example the 9.92 must be upgraded to 9.93.
  3. Other than this mandatory adjustment, a judge may not change his score.
  4. If no score is more than,02 higher or lower than the middle score, then there is no adjustment.
  5. After assuring that any necessary adjustment has been, made, the Chief Official then says, “Score”, and the scores to the audience, the competitors, and the scorekeeper as usual.

Section 8.01 TRADITIONAL These forms must capture the essence of classic martial arts movements, displaying the traditional techniques, stances, footwork, and weapons. Emphasis is placed on execution of technique, application of technique, balance, speed, power, solid stances, and focus.

  • a) Movements that involve more than a 360-degree spin;
  • b) Require the body to be inverted more than parallel to the floor;
  • c) More than two kicks with the same leg without putting the foot down in between;
  • d) Front or back flips;
  • e) Cartwheels;
  • f) Front or side leg splits;
  • g) Releases of the weapon other than simple hand switches;

h) or any other gymnastic movements or extreme exhibitions of flexibility or agility with the body or weapon that are deemed in the opinion of the judges to be inappropriate for the division pursuant to the general guidelines set forth here. (EXCEPTION – A Forward Roll is a legal Traditional Technique.) Commentary There has been a great deal of debate among reputable martial artists regarding whether a form or series of moves are outside of the bounds of the Traditional Division.

Because NASKA is a tournament circuit open to all styles and schools (across the nation and around the world) and from which judges are utilized, each competitor must make his or her own decision regarding whether to include movements, which might be to be objectionable for the Traditional Division.

Just like the extreme and creative competitors, the traditional competitors will try to extend the base of the rules that govern the traditional divisions to gain an advantage over their competition. If there is something performed in a traditional from or weapon division that is not covered by the above rules, the NASKA Rules Officials will make the decisions if a technique is a legal or illegal move.

Section 8.02 CREATIVE The Creative Division allows forms to include contemporary martial arts techniques that have evolved over the last 30 years. These may be added to a traditional form, or the form may be devised in its entirety by the competitor. The Creative Division was formerly known as the Open Division and before that the American Division.

A form in the Creative Division must ONLY include techniques which originate from martial arts and like the Traditional Division, emphasis will be placed on execution of the techniques, application of the techniques, balance, speed, power, solid stances, and focus Spinning kicks, jump spinning kicks, flying kicks, multiple kicks, splits, weapon twirls, weapon releases, and other creative martial arts techniques are permitted.

  1. a) Movements that involve more than a 360-degree spin;
  2. b) require the body to be inverted more than parallel to the floor;
  3. c) or are similar to movements found in gymnastics and/or non-martial arts disciplines;
  4. d) or forms that meet the above definition of strictly traditional forms.
  5. Although one creative move qualifies a competitor for the creative divisions, it should be expected that a creative form or weapon routine with multiple creative moves of good quality would prevail as the winner, assuming all other criteria is met. The following techniques are legal in the Creative Divisions and will be score as any other techniques (power, speed, balance, and proper execution):
  6. a) Butterfly kick;
  7. b) Illusion kick;
  8. c) Forward Roll;
  9. d) Kip Up.

Commentary The Creative Division is intended for those competitors who do not wish to compete with a strictly traditional form, and/or do not wish to compete against other participants who execute extreme gymnastic-type movements. Over the past several years, it was often observed that judging these “creative” forms in the same division with forms including extreme martial arts “tricks” was essentially comparing apples and oranges, and to be more fair to the participants these divisions should be separated.

NASKA has therefore created a separate “Extreme Division”, as detailed below, separate and distinct from the Creative Division, thus allowing the Creative Division to include only those forms with movements that originate more inherently from the classic martial arts systems. Regarding the Creative Weapons Divisions, it is important to note that any weapons movement shall NOT be a factor in determining whether the weapons form constitutes a Creative or Extreme Form.

The determining factor shall be the particular body movements as defined below in the Extreme Divisions. Consequently, a Creative Weapons competitor is permitted to perform any weapons move (i.e., twirls, releases, spins, etc.), but is not permitted to perform “Extreme” body movements (i.e.

flips, 540 and above spins, or any inverted body moves, etc.). Page | 28 NASKA (North American Sport Karate Association) 600 Sherwood Rd, Shoreview, MN 55126 New Revisions The following are techniques that are legal in the Creative form/weapon divisions: Butterfly Kick, Illusion Kick, Forward Roll and Kip Up.

They will be scored as any other techniques: power, speed, balance and proper execution. Section 8.03 EXTREME The Extreme Divisions allow the competitor to perform any movements whether they originate from traditional or contemporary martial arts systems or otherwise.

  • a) the quality of execution of techniques and movements;
  • b) martial arts skills,
  • c) balance, speed, and power;
  • d) degree of difficulty;
  • e) and showmanship.

In addition, only those movements that portray a definite offensive or defensive martial arts purpose, or are included to illustrate extreme flexibility or agility, are allowed. Inclusion of other movements, or the performance of a form or weapon from meeting the criteria above for a Traditional or Creative form, will result in a down grade by the judges, or upon a unanimous vote of the judges, a “no score” as a form inappropriate for the division.

NOTE – Although one extreme move qualifies a competitor for the extreme divisions, it should be expected that an extreme form or weapon routine with multiple extreme moves of good quality would prevail as the winner, assuming all other criteria is met. Commentary: As martial arts evolves from the Traditional to Creative to Extreme, this category allows for the integration of techniques and movements from all martial art styles, gymnastics, acrobatics, dance, and athletic disciplines.

If a competitor wishes to participate in a division with moves not permitted in the Traditional and Creative Divisions but meeting the guidelines described here, the competitor should compete in the Extreme Division.

  1. Section 8.04 MUSICAL
  2. The Musical Divisions requires an empty hand form or weapons form to meet all the above criteria for a Traditional, Creative, and Extreme form, and additionally meet the requirements of the “Divisional Music Rule” below.
  3. Section 8.05 DIVISIONAL MUSIC RULE
  4. Music Choreography should be judged as follows:

a) The movements of the form must be accented by and performed in conjunction with specific beats, notes, or words in the music. Simply performing your form to the same rhythm or cadence of a song is not satisfactory.

  • b) If sound effects are added to the music, the form should not solely be choreographed to the added sound effects.
  • c) Music and sound effects should appropriately match each other, and set the overall mood for each performance.
  • d) Overall, all music, and sound effects used, must compliment the form, and both the form and music should be judged together and viewed as an overall performance, not simply as a form performed with music playing.

Each competitor must provide a music player of reasonable and non-intrusive size at ringside to play his or her music, and an attendant at the player who must be present at all times during the performance (unless it is advertised that music players will be supplied).

As each form begins, a music volume check must be made, during which time the player attendant will look to the center judge for a nod of approval or a signal to lower the volume. Once this volume is set, it may not be increased during the performance of the form. Commentary: If a competitor chooses to use music in a grand championship division to a form that does not require music, the “Divisional Music Rule” does not apply.

Commentary: If a competitor receives a “no score” decision by the judges because they feel the competitor’s form is not appropriate for the division, the competitor is not allowed to redo his/her form or weapon form in that division. It is the responsibility of the competitor to read and understand the rules of the division he/she is competing in before competition starts.

Section 8.06 Chinese A Form or Weapon routine in the Chinese Division can include techniques which originate from the style of martial arts the competitor represents and emphasis will be placed on execution of the techniques, application of the techniques, balance, speed, power, solid stances, and focus.

The movement of the competitor will determine what NASKA runoff or Grand the Chinese competitor will compete in. Movement of the following will place the Chinese Competitor in the NASKA CMX (Creative, Musical, or Extreme) runoff / Grand: (a) Movements that involve more than a 360-degree spin; (b) require the body to be inverted more than parallel to the floor; (c) or are similar to movements found in gymnastics and/or non-martial arts disciplines; (a) Butterfly kick; (b) Illusion kick; (g) Kip Up.

Should a Chinese competitor enter a NASKA division that is not declared Chinese Division (Musical, Creative or Extreme, the competitor must follow the standard rules for that Division. Music is not allowed in the Chinese Divisions, as NASKA offers a Musical Division for both Forms and Weapons. Section 8.07 Kenpo or Kempo There are various styles of Kenpo and Kempo that can compete in this division.

Although consideration should be given if the system / style is related to Chinese origin / style, then the competitor may elect to compete in the Chinese Division. A Form or Weapon routine in the Kenpo or Kempo Division can include techniques which originate from the style of martial arts the competitor represents and emphasis will be placed on execution of the techniques, application of the techniques, balance, speed, power, solid stances, and focus.

  1. The movement of the competitor will determine what NASKA runoff or Grand the Kenpo or Kempo competitor will compete in.
  2. Movement of the following will place the Kenpo or Kempo Competitor in the NASKA CMX (Creative, Musical, or Extreme) runoff / Grand: (d) Movements that involve more than a 360-degree spin; (e) require the body to be inverted more than parallel to the floor; (f) or are similar to movements found in gymnastics and/or non-martial arts disciplines; (c) Butterfly kick; (d) Illusion kick; (h) Kip Up.

Should a Kenpo or Kempo competitor enter a NASKA division that is not declared Kenpo or Kempo Division (Musical, Creative or Extreme, the competitor must follow the standard rules for that Division. Music is not allowed in the Kenpo or Kempo Divisions, as NASKA offers a Musical Division for both Forms and Weapons.

Section 8.08 GRAND CHAMPIONSHIPS AND OVERALL GRAND CHAMPIONSHIPS All competitors must compete in any Grand Championship and/or Overall Grand Championship with the style of forms or weapons (not exact form or weapon) they won with in their division (EXAMPLE – A winner of a creative form cannot compete with an extreme form in the grand championships) If a competitor wins more than one division, they have the option to select the style of form or weapon of the divisions they won.

All competitors may use music in all Overall Weapons and Forms Grand Championships and Overall Grand Championships runoffs. Youth Weapons and Forms Grand Championships, music may only be used by competitors in the CMX Youth Grand Championships (this includes creative and extreme winners).

  • To Compete in an 18+ Divisional Grand Championships, Overall Grand Championships, and/or Runoff in Forms, Weapons and/or Sparring, a competitor must have won an 18+ Division.
  • NOTE – New Traditional Challenge Division.
  • A 30 and older competitors can compete in the 18+ Traditional Challenge and still compete in their regular 30+ Form Weapon’s Division.

Section 8.09 WEAPON BREAKS OR AND WEAPON CRACKS a) A competitor will be disqualified if he/she breaks their weapon, separates into 2 or more pieces. b) If the Weapon cracks, does not separate, the competitor may continue the routine and will not be disqualified.

The competitor may have their score lowered, if in the opinion of the judges, the Crack impacted the execution of the form or the effectiveness of the weapon. Section 8.10 LOSS OF WEAPON CONTROL IN FINALS AND OVERALL RUN-OFFS a) Loss of Control is divided into three categories and penalties: I. Category 1 = bobble but no interruption of form =,01 to,03 deduction (Discretion of the judges) II.

Category 2 = form interrupted (usually a drop) =,05 deduction III. Category 3 = if the weapons goes out of bounds and/or off platform, or the competitor strikes a spectator, judge, or other person with the weapon regardless of intent = disqualification

  1. b) Deductions are mandatory, and each judge deducts from his or her score before figuring their Relative Ranking order.
  2. c) If a competitor drops their weapons twice they will be disqualified.
  3. d) Score after deductions is subject to adjustment by Maximum Deviation Rule (See Article VII) just like any other score.

e) If Category 1 or 2 occurs, competitor may continue and be scored, or may bow out and not be scored or placed. (b) Disqualification for Category 3 is decision of Center Official or a majority of other judges. Judges only conference is held as soon as weapon goes out of bounds.

  • F) A cracked or broken weapon is treated as a loss of control.
  • If the break or crack prevents the weapon from being used as intended, it is a Category 3.
  • G) Rule is used during finals and overall runoffs in all black belt divisions.
  • H) In all regular eliminations, Weapon Divisions, a competitor will be disqualified if they drop a weapon and no points or placement is awarded.

CLASSICAL KATA – TRADITIONAL CHALLENGE FORM Section 8.11 OVERVIEW AND INTENT The Classical Kata (Traditional Challenge Divisions) will showcase the patterns of recognized Karate systems from Japan (Shotokan, Shito-Ryu, Goju-Ryu, Wado-Ryu, Chito-Ryu) and Okinawa (Shorin-Ryu, Isshin-Ryu, Goju-Ryu, Uechi-Ryu).

Competitors must perform a recognized unaltered/unmodified kata from one of the above systems and no additions or deletions of movements are allowed. School variations are permitted provided the movements maintain the structural integrity of the original kata. Commentary Unlike the Japanese/Okinawan division (NASKA), competitors must only perform unmodified katas from Japanese or Okinawan Karate systems.

Competitors who choose to alter/modify a classical working or add/delete moves are strongly encouraged to enter the NASKA Japanese/Okinawan division as such changes to the kata will result in disqualification in the Traditional Challenge division. Section 8.12 SPECIFIC CRITERIA Although Okinawan and Japanese styles have many stylistic similarities, the following subtle differences must be observed: a.

Japanese styles (i.e. Shotokan, Wado-Ryu, and Kyukoshinkai) generally have: i. lower chamber, longer and wider stances (especially zenkutsu-dachi); ii. horse stances with toes pointing parallel (kiba dachi); iii. emphasis on use of back stance (or kokutsu dachi); iv. and thrusting kicks with maximum height to the competitor own chin.

b) Okinawan styles (i.e. Shorin-Ryu, Isshin-Ryu, and Ryuei-Ryu) generally have: i. higher chamber; ii. higher and shorter stances (more use of natural stance and sanchin dachi); iii. horse stances with toes pointing outward (shiko dachi); iv. emphasis on use of cat stance (neko ashi dachi); v.

  • Section 8.14 KEY ELEMENTS OF SCORING
  • Competitors will be judged/scored on focus (kime), proper execution of technique (punches, kicks, and stances), proper breathing and hip rotation. Judges take into account and evaluate the competitor on:
  • a) basic techniques, stances, punches, blocks and kicks executed with balance, strength and focus;
  • b) Eyes (Visual Expression of the Competitor);
  • c) The Pace of the Kata, Breathing (Proper Exhalation);
  • d) and focus of attention (chakugan).
  • The competitor must have an understanding of application (bunkai) and the criteria specific to the individual kata. Specifics:
  • a) Kia – Minimum of two (2), Maximum of four (4);
  • b) Kicks – Standing kicks must not go above the competitor’s shoulder;
  • c) Stances must not break parallel.
  • Section 8.15 SCORING/OFFICIATING

Five judges are the standard numbers of judges that will be used; however, it is acceptable to use only three judges. If (5) judges are used, the highest and lowest scores will be dropped and the remaining three scores will be added together. A scoring range of 9.90 to 9.99 will be used in the eliminations; a range of 9.96 to 10 will be used in the finals.

  1. Section 8.16 PROCEDURE
  2. The following procedures will be used by the Officials.
  3. a) Seeds are selected, per NASKA Seeding Rules, see Article XII.

b) The remaining Competitors will be shuffled to determine the order. Center Judge is responsible for this task. c) Time Limit: 4 minutes, the clock starts when competitor enters the ring. The competitor will bow in and announce the name of the Kata only. He or she will be recognized by the center judge and the kata may begin.

  • Section 8.17 OFFICIAL’S DUTIES IN PROCEDURE
  • a) One Official is designated to count the Kia;
  • b) One official will watch for the height of the kick;
  • c) The Center Official (who is the highest most experienced rank) will raise a hand if the form is indeed traditional.
  • d) Upon approval, the judges will make notes on their board as to how they will score.
  • e) After seeing all the competitors, scoring begins for each competitor.
  • f) Competitors will line-up in the order they competed in to be scored.
  • g) Disqualified competitors receive no score.
  • Section 8.18 DISQUALIFICATION
  • Competitors may be disqualified for one of the following:
  • a) Doing a non-traditional form (altered or made up);
  • b) Kia rule not followed (too many or not enough);
  • c) Out of bounds;
  • d) Sportsmanship not adhered to;
  • e) Excessive stance violation.
  • Section 8.19 KATA LIST

The list of katas below are the ones recognized by the WKF and JKF for the four major styles of Japanese Karate (Goju, Shito, Wado and Shotokan) and the Okinawan Prefecture Karate Rengokai for the Okinawan styles (Goju, Shorin, Uechi, Isshin and Ryuei-Ryu).

  1. Section 9.01 TEAM DIVISIONS
  2. a) 3-Man Team Sparring (Max 4 Team Members)
  3. b) 2-Women Team Sparring (Max 3 Team Members)
  4. c) 3-Boy Youth Sparring Teams
  5. d) 2-Girl Youth Sparring Teams
  6. e) Senior Teams
  7. Section 9.02 ADULT TEAMS

When teams are called to the sparring surface (mat), only the 3 or 4 male competitors and 1 coach or 2 or 3 women competitors and 1 coach can appear on the mat. All other team members and coaches must remain off the mat and/or sparring area. A team may only declare 3 or 4 male team competitors per event/tournament or 2 or 3 female team competitors.

  1. In other words, a team may not bring in a 5th competitor for men or a 4th for women at that event/tournament.
  2. If Team Sparring is an event at the night-time final or moved to a new ring during eliminations, it is the Promoter responsibility to ensure each team card, of the teams competing, is moved to the new ring and / or with the documentation for the night-time finals.

Competitors must be 18 years old or older (NASKA Age Rule). No youth competitor can participate in Adult sparring competition. a) Teams must submit a roster for their team to NASKA at the time a new team is formed to earn points and use their seed. b) Teams are allowed to add a new member to their team.

They must submit the new member to NASKA to earn points and use their seed. c) A team may pick up and use a competitor / competitors that are not listed on their roster with NASKA at any event/tournament. However, they will not earn any points or be allowed to use their seed. d) Pick up teams are allowed; however, the teams will not earn any rating points until they register with NASKA.

To earn points and a seed, each team member must be a registered NASKA member. e) A team may have multiple coaches but only one coach can be designated to coach at one time. The coach will be required to sit in a chair and follow the rules for coaching.

(See Section 9.08) f) All teams must obtain a team card at registration or from the Tournament NASKA Black Belt Arbitrators and declare who will participate at the event/tournament. g) All team competitors, 3 or 4 for men, 2 or 3 for women, must be listed on the card and submitted at the ring prior to start of the division.

It is the responsibility of the promoter to provide the team cards for competition. h) When teams are called to the sparring surface (mat), only the 3 or 4 male competitors and 1 coach or 2 or 3 women competitors and 1 coach can appear on the mat. All other team members and coaches must remain off the mat and/or sparring area.

  1. I) A team may only declare 3 or 4 male team competitors per event/tournament or 2 or 3 female team competitors.
  2. In other words, a team may not bring in a 5th competitor for men or a 4th for women at that event/tournament.
  3. Section 9.03 SENIOR AND JUNIOR SPARRING TEAMS Where ages are different, the appropriate ages must be matched together (Exceptions below.) A coin flip will determine which team will send an initial competitor and the other team must send a matching age competitor.
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a) Junior 3-Boy Sparring Teams and Junior 2-Girl Sparring Teams A younger age category competitor can compete up 1 age category older (EXAMPLE – A 13 & younger age category can compete up into the 14-15 age category and/or a 14-15 age category competitor can compete up into the 16-17 team age category).

Same for Girl’s age categories as well. b) Senior Sparring Teams An older age category competitor can compete down in a younger age category but a younger age category competitor cannot compete up into an older age category. Section 9.04 TEAM MEMBERS Since there are only 3 individual team rounds for men and 2 individual team rounds for women, a men’s team that has 4 members and a women’s team that has 3 members have an additional member.

The additional member can be used at any time – See Section 9.06. Any player on a 4-man team or a 3-woman team can be used equally but can only fight once in a team round (Exception: see ties and overtime period). The additional member can be used as a strategy in any round during a match, but the 4 men team members and 3 women team members must be declared when the teams are called to the mat, prior to the start of the first team round.

  1. The competitors / members must match the names presented on the team card, at the start of the competition.
  2. After the start of the team’s first round only the team members that are declared can be used in any additional rounds at a single tournament.
  3. A specific member does not have to be named as the substitute since any 4 members on men’s teams and any 3 members on women’s teams can be used equally in the 3 men fights and 2 women fights.

Section 9.05 INJURY Any declared Team Member, who has not completed during the match, can replace an injured competitor that cannot continue during a match. If this happens, the injured competitor cannot be used again in the team event at that tournament.

If it is considered by the officials, with great certainty, that a fighter is faking an injury for any reason the fighter can be disqualified). See Section 9.11 – Disqualified Competitor. Section 9.06 MATCH RULES a) A flip of a coin will determine who sends out the first competitor. The winner of the coin flip can decide to send the first competitor or have the other team send out first.

After the first competitors, the teams then alternate who must sends out a fighter first to be matched by the other team. b) All matches are 90 seconds long. c) The competitors who earns a 10-point spread or is ahead at the end of 90 seconds is declared the winner of the first 2 matches (first match only in 2 –women teams).

  • d) The final match is total points match using the full 90 seconds.
  • e) The team with the most accumulated points wins, but the accumulated score is a must win by 2 points.
  • f) If at the end of the final match the accumulated score is a tie, or 1 point separates the teams, overtime is required to determine the winner.

g) In overtime, a coin toss will determine who will send out a fighter to finish the match. The winner of the coin flip can decide to send out first or have the other team send out first.

  1. Section 9.07 GENERAL RULES – TEAM SPARRING
  2. a) All regular NASKA Light touch point calling rules will apply.
  3. b) Out of Bound, falling down or excessive running (as determined by the head official) around the ring will be considered an attempt to avoid competition and the other competitor will be awarded a point.

c) A competitor is considered out of bound when they have both feet off the sparring area (mat). If the competitor is out of bounds without being kicked out or physically pushed out of bounds, their opponent will receive 1 point. d) If a competitor goes out of bounds while the other competitor is kicking or punching, near the competitor WITHOUT actually touching the competitor, the competitor will be considered leaving the sparring area to avoid competition and the other competitor will receive a point.

  1. A fighter must stay engaged in the match if he goes at of bounds not to be penalized.
  2. E) If the out-of-bound competitor is scored on, with a legal technique, before the center official calls STOP, then the in-bounds competitor can receive a score for the technique and the penalty point from the other competitor going out of bounds to avoid fighting.

f) If a fighter touches the ground / mat with, with any part of their body, except their feet or 1 hand, they are considered down. g) A point cannot be scored by a down competitor and a downed competitor cannot be score on. If an upright competitor strikes a down competition they can be penalized.

  • Section 9.08 COACHES
  • a) Teams may have a coach or coaches but only one designated coach at a time.
  • b) Only the designated coach at the time of a protest and arbitration can speak on behalf of the player.
  • c) Coaches may be team members.
  • d) Coaches may be changed from one fight to another but if a change is made the Center Official must be notified of the change for it to be official.
  • e) The designated coach of a team must stay seated in the designated coaching chair anytime a match is in progress.
  • f) A coach may stand before a match is started, between rounds, during timeouts and once the sparring match is over.

g) Coaching Penalty: If a coach leaves his/her chair, during a sparring match, a penalty point will be awarded to the opposing team for the first, second and third time it occurs. A flag or other tool will be provided, at the coach’s chair, to throw into the ring to call for a judgement or protest.

However, if the center official has ruled a judge’s call was late and therefore not considered, arbitration cannot be requested. On the 3rd occurrence in any one round the coach and coach’s competitor will be disqualified. (See Section 9.11) h) A disqualified player and coach can be replaced for further team rounds/matches.

i) Penalty points on coaches are issued on the coach’s player of that round. j) Since the coach and player are considered the same as far as penalties go, if a player already has a penalty point and the coach receives 2 penalty points for standing, etc.

  • The player is automatically disqualified because 3 penalty points were received in one round.
  • K) Just like a player, coaches can be penalized or disqualified for unsportsmanlike behavior.
  • If a coach is disqualified they can be replaced.
  • Section 9.09 INJURED TEAM COMPETITOR a) The medic has the final determination if a competitor may NOT continue, with NO exceptions.

b) If a competitor is injured not due to a penalty they are allowed 4 minutes to determine if they can continue, starting immediately. The time may be extended two additional minutes, once the medic reaches the competitor. It is the center official’s responsibility to communicate with the medic and determine if additional time will be allowed.

The center official must then inform the scorekeeper who is keeping up with the time of the delay. A medic can always request an extension time to properly determine if the competitor can continue. The maximum time that can be allocated to determine if a competitor can continue is 8 minutes. c) After the time, has expired, they must continue or will be declared unable to continue.

If they are declared unable to continue the 4th team competitor / member completes the sparring match in progress, provided he / she have not already competed during the match. d) On a third request for an injury timeout, the competitor will NOT be allowed to continue.

The Referee and Judges will follow normal protocol to see if the injury was the results of an illegal technique. e) If it is determined the injured competitor cannot continue due to a penalty as determined by center referee and judges the uninjured competitor is disqualified. f) If the competitor cannot continue due to a penalty, the injured competitor will receive 10 points as a result of the disqualification.

The competitor who committed the violation will get 0 points for that round. g) If a competitor cannot continue because of an injury where there is no penalty call and they do not have an alternate to continue the match, the uninjured competitor will receive a ten-point spread unless it is the last match.

  1. h) If a competitor is disqualified in the last match the other team automatically will be declared the winner of that team match.
  2. i) If two or more competitors are injured, the team could win the match, but will NOT be allowed to continue in future matches at the tournament.
  3. j) Once a competitor is injured and replaced by the alternate, the injured competitor cannot compete for the remainder of the team sparring competition.
  4. k) If something happens in the team sparring competition that cannot be answered by the rules stated, the “NASKA Fairness Rule” will come into play.
  5. Section 9.10 PENALTIES AND WARNINGS

a) NO WARNINGS are issued in NASKA Black Belt sparring. Penalty points are issued immediately for breaking the rules. b) A penalty point will be issues if a competitor, as determined by the center official: i. Goes out of bounds to avoid competition; ii.

Falls down to avoid competition; iii. Runs around the ring to avoid competition; iv. Stalling and/or not attempting to engage the other competitor; v. Excessive contact, as deemed by the center official; vi. Pushing a competitor out of bound, as deemed by the center official; vii. A coach stands up or leaves the coach’s chair during the match; viii.

A competitor arrives at the ring without the proper equipment; ix. A sparring match is ready to start and the competitor is delaying his / her entry in the ring; x. Form/Weapon competitor delays entering the ring xi. Competitor refuses to leave the immediate sparring area an additional penalty point may be issued; xii.

Late strikes after call to stop; xiii Retaliation strike from a competitor; xiv Competitor’s equipment is incorrectly fitted or properly secured and continues to fall off or requires adjustments; or xv A competitor purposely removes their equipment. c) Once a competitor receive 3 penalty points they are disqualified.

If a penalty is called on one or both competitors, the penalty point(s) must be issued to the competitor(s). This ensures the penalties are counted to determine an automatic disqualification. For example; both competitors continue to spar after STOP is called.

  • Section 9.11 DISQUALIFIED COMPETITOR
  • a) Loses all points they have earned in the match.
  • b) If during the final match, his/her team cannot win, the opposing team will be declared the winner.
  • c) Any competitor who injures a competitor with an illegal technique.

d) Any competitor, team member, or coach who enters the sparring area, in the event an altercation happens, and accelerate the altercation / does not attempt to control their competitor, will be disqualified. (EXAMPLE – A fight between 2 competitors, if any the above enters the sparring area and throws a punch or kick, they will immediately be disqualified.)

  1. e) If anyone refuses to leave, security will be called and a suspension and/or tournament disqualification (Tournament Disqualification is where the disqualified person(s) must leave the tournament site) would be given to that individual or individuals.
  2. f) If 2 or more members, of any team are disqualified in one match, the team is automatically disqualified and cannot continue.
  3. g) A disqualified competitor cannot be used in any remaining matches in a tournament team event.

h) In the event that a team sparring competitor continues to fight after the match is called to stop, it is the responsibility of the Center Official and Corner Judges to control the competitors. If a coach(s) and/or team member(s) come into the ring during this time and restrict the officials from following through on their responsibility of controlling the competitors, the team or teams can be disqualified.

  • Section 10.01 TEAM SYNCHRONIZED FORMS DIVISION
  • Team Synchronized Forms is defined as a group organized to function cooperatively in a joint effort. Synchronized: Working at same time or rate/ Go together or happen at the same time/ Working in unison/ Use of Techniques in a Domino effect
  • Section 10.02 TEAM SYNCHRONIZED FORMS JUDGING
  • Synchronize Team Forms will be graded on how well a team is working in a cooperative joint effort with the majority of techniques being executed together, at the same time, in unison and/or in a domino sequence effect.
  • Section 10.03 TEAM SYNCHRONIZED FORMS GENERAL RULES
  • a) Teams are comprised of 2 – 5 members; however, 60% of the original declared team must be present for the team to earn points;
  • b) 4 Minute Maximum Time Limit – Time starts when the first team member steps into the competition ring and ends when the team is obviously finished in the opinion of the Center Official.
  • c) Empty Hand Forms, Weapons Forms or combinations of both are legal.
  • d) All the technical Martial Arts skills are graded for execution, presentation and difficulty.
  • Section 10.04 TEAM DEMONSTRATION DEFINITION

Team Demonstration is given more liberties and freedoms to exhibit one or a combination of Martial Arts Skills. Synchronization may or may not be a part of team demonstration. Section 10.05 TEAM DEMONSTRATION GENERAL RULES a) Teams are comprised of 2 – 15 members; however, 60% of the original declared team must be present for the team to earn points.

B) A team may compete and have their score counted, if a. They are competing with the original declared members; b. Additional “extra” member(s) cannot compete unless they are replacing an original member; c. Substitutes are allowed, but only to replaced missing declared members and will not be considered as original team members; and / or d.

Additional competitor(s) cannot compete with a team, except to substitute a missing member. Examples: a. A team registers its’ team with 3 members – 2 original members must compete in the team event to be considered a legal team; b. A team registered its’ team with 10 members, 6 original members must compete in the team event to be considered a legal team c) A team may change their team by replacing a member(s) or by adding new members.

All changes must be made prior to the next event and cannot exceed 60% or the original team. d) 4 Minute Maximum Time Limit – Time starts when the first team member steps into the competition ring and ends when the team is obviously finished in the opinion of the Center Official. e) All the technical Martial Arts skills are graded for execution, presentation and difficulty.

Section 10.06 PROPS Props that are considered dangerous or harmful to people and/or to any part of the competition area or that will cause major clean up time will not be allowed. All teams are responsible for their own clean up. If a team has any question about their Team Synchronize Form or Team Demonstration, they should ask the Center Official before competition starts.

  • Section 11.01 GENERAL OVERVIEW NASKA tabulates points for hundreds of divisions each year ranging from five-year-old beginner white belts to senior black belts.
  • These tabulated points determine seeding of Black Belt competitors at world tournaments and determine NASKA’s end of year World and National champions.

When determining these World and National champions, it is essential that the point tabulations be accurate and timely. Each member can help greatly in the accuracy of the ratings by understanding and following the NASKA Rating Rules. Section 11.02 COMPETITOR RECORD RESULTS FORMS In each membership package, there will be Competitor Results Record Forms.

  1. This Record Results Form is for you to keep a record of your personal competition wins in NASKA world, national and state tournaments.
  2. The Record Form must be fully filled out and e-mailed () to the NASKA ratings office after each NASKA tournament you enter.
  3. A) Always keep an original tabulations sheet for your records.

Please send in your results immediately after each tournament. A new updated rating sheet is updated after most World Tournaments (see Ratings, Seeding and Best of Scores schedule). To guarantee your current results will be included on each new updated ratings sheet, you must have your tabulation sheet in the NASKA office within five (5) days after the conclusion of each World tournament.

B) Do not wait and send several tournaments at one time. Most errors occur when the office is entering a long list of tournaments results rather than one tournament at a time. Send your entire list of tournaments each time rather than just the last tournament you entered. c) Once the ratings office receives your tabulations sheet, your results are checked and compiled in your computerized membership file.

No points will not be tabulated into your file until we receive your Record Results Form. d) The promoter’s results will be used to check the competitor’s tabulation sheet creating a doublechecking procedure for accuracy if there are any discrepancies or protest.

E) World tournament scores will be used in determining the world Black Belt champions. All world, national & state points will be used in determining national champions. All of a competitor’s world tournament scores will be used to calculate a competitor’ final World rating (A Black Belt competitor’s best 9 World scores in each division will count toward their final ratings).

See “Ratings Schedule and Best of Scores Sheet”. f) World Black Belt Team Synchronized Form, Team Demonstration and Men, Women and Youth Team sparring will be rated using all world tournament scores not just the Best of Scores. g) The current year’s World NASKA ratings will be used for seeding once they are published.

The Previous Year’s World ratings will be used for seeding before the New Year’s ratings are published. (See Rating, Seeding and “Best of Scores” Chart in your membership packet for details). h) The NASKA Ratings Office will use only the best 9 scores for each Black Belt competitor’s final World record.

You may enter as many tournaments as you like but only your best 9 scores will count toward your final World rating. (See Rating, Seeding and “Best of Scores” Chart in your membership packet for details). i) Ratings for National Black and Under Black Belts Competitors will count all tournaments entered.

  1. World Ratings for under black belts will use the same ratings system as World Black Belts.
  2. Section 11.03 RATINGS GUIDELINES a) To ensure accurate competition results, please read and follow the rating guidelines below: b) Make sure the tournaments you are entering are NASKA rated and note the type of rating they hold (1-A, 2-A, 3-A, 4-A, 5-A, 6-A State).

Some tournaments advertise as NASKA Rated but are not. Check the NASKA Website Calendar or email the NASKA office to verify if a tournament is NASKA rated. Make sure you know the correct name of the tournament. Keep a flyer of the tournament in case there is a question whether the tournament was officially rated by NASKA.

  1. C) You must be a current registered NASKA member with a current NASKA membership application filled out and on file in the NASKA office.
  2. D) The NASKA rating period is on a calendar year (January thru December).
  3. E) Make sure you put your name and NASKA I.D.
  4. Number on your point tabulation sheet.
  5. Many competitors Result Record Forms have been sent to the NASKA office without a name or ID number listed.

f) Make sure you write in the division/s names and your placement, 1st thru 8th only. Please include the following: g) Age (age group you competed in); i. rating category (black belt, advance belt, intermediate, and beginner); ii. weight division; iii. form style, (examples: Traditional, Korean, Creative, Musical, etc.) iv.

All the rated divisions are on the membership application (See Membership Application).v. If you change divisions because of age, weight, style, rank change, etc., note the change on your tabulation sheet and when you changed divisions. vi. Rated Categories: Black Belt, Advance (usually red and brown), Intermediate (usually green, purple, blue), beginner (usually white, orange, gold or yellow).

h) All competitors have the right to compete in one age group for the whole calendar year. A competitor can compete for the entire calendar year at the age he/she is on June 30 of that year (See Legal Age Rule in the NASKA rules.) i) Transfer of Points i.

Black Belt Divisions: No points can be transferred from any under black belt division into a black belt division. No points can be transferred from one black belt division to another. You can only earn points in the black belt division you compete in. If you compete in several different black belt divisions and place, you will be rated in each division.

ii. All of their point will go toward this division even if they did not win the points in that division. j) After the 2nd World tournament in 2017, new ratings will be tabulated as per the Ratings Schedule and Best of Scores sheet. A competitor’s rating points will only show up in the ratings if he/she sends their Record Result Form to the NASKA office.

  1. We must have the tabulation sheet in the NASKA office at least 7 days in front of the next World tournament to guarantee it is included in the most current updated ratings.
  2. Rating sheets will be emailed out to all NASKA Members and distributed at all World tournaments.
  3. K) It is the goal of the NASKA rating office to have the most accurate and timely ratings as possible.

For this to happen there needs to be a good working relationship between the competitor, the promoter and the NASKA office. Out of thousands of competitors that participate in NASKA events each year, 99.9% of NASKA competitors are completely honest about their tournament wins and division/s selections.

In a very few cases a competitor may try to manipulate their point totals dishonestly to gain an advantage over another competitor. When a competitor is caught deliberately falsifying his/her tabulation sheets, he/she will be totally excluded from the ratings. l) If a competitor is totally suspended from the NASKA tournament circuit for any reason, he/she will be excluded from the ratings.

Section 12.01 FIRST TWO or THREE TOURNAMENT SEEDING Once the New Year’s rating is published, generally at the 3rd or 4th World tournament of the new year, the new ratings will be used to seed competitors. Section 12.02 SCHEDULE OF RATINGS AND BEST OF SCORES CHART The “Schedule of Ratings” shows when the most updated ratings will be tabulated.

  • Best of Scores” tells the maximum best scores that will be used to calculate each competitor’s ratings.
  • Section 12.03 SEEDING Competitors can only be seeded in divisions they are rated.
  • Points earned in one division do not carry over into another division.
  • The only exception to this rule is in the first 2 tournaments of the year when a competitor is required to move into an older age division.

The competitors moving into an older age division have an opportunity to be seeded in the older division although they have not earned points in that age division (See Priority Order of Seeding below). An exception to this rule is if a competitor moves up into an older division in the last tournament of the year in an attempt to secure a seed over competitors that were ahead of them in points in the younger division but chose to stay in their legal age division all year.

  1. The ones moving up into the older division would be rated over the ones who changed age divisions in the last tournament of the year.
  2. Section 12.04 PRIORITY ORDER OF SEEDING IN FORMS AND WEAPONS Seeding is determined by three-groups of seeds; Group A, Group B and Group C.
  3. Group-A are only the top 4 seeds and ties, based on the current ranking.

Group-B are the remaining seeds and will be selected, if needed, in seed order. The final Group, Group-C are comprised of competitors who have moved up in age, from the previous year. Group-C is only considered for the first two or three events of the year where the previous year’s ratings are being used for seeding) of any year.

They are selected, if needed, in seed order. Section 12.05 MAXIMUM SEEDS – FORMS AND WEAPONS There is a Maximum of 4 seeds in Form and Weapons Divisions unless there are ties in placements. Ties can be added into the Group Shuffles. Section 12.06 FORMS AND WEAPONS SEEDING First look at Group-A top 4 seeds (normally seeds numbers 1, 2, 3, and 4) and see how many are present.

If all competitors are all present, including ties, the number of seeds needed is complete and will be shuffled for order. If ties exist within the seeds, usually seed 1 and / or seed 2, lower top 4 seeds may not be included in the shuffler. See examples below.

If some of the top 4 competitors are not present; the number of competitors needed to fill the Maximum of 4 seeds will be selected from Group-B (next) and Group-C (if needed). For examples: – The top 4 competitors or seed 1, seed 2, seed 3 and seed 4 are present; then all will go into the group-A shuffle; – There are 2 seeds ranked number 1 who are at the event, a number 2 seed, a number 3 and a number 4 seed.

All are present. As NASKA only takes the top 4 into group-A; therefore, the 2 number 1’s, the number 2 and number 3 will go into the group-A shuffle; – There are 2 seeds ranked number, 1 who are at the event, a number 2 seed, 2 number 3 and a number 4 seed.

All are present. As NASKA only takes the top 4 into group-A, the 2 number 1’s, the number 2 and the 2 number 3’s will go into the shuffle. In this example 5 competitors will be in the group-A shuffle. – There is 1 seed ranked 1, 2 and 3 and 3 seeds ranked 4th, all are present. In this example 6 competitors will be included in the group-A shuffle.

3 Best Martial Arts Styles | No, It’s Not Yours

If only 2 of the top 4 are present in Group-A then you will need two more seeds to complete the seeding. If the two more seeds needed to make a total of 4 are found in Group-B, the seeding is complete. The 2 seeds selected from Group-B are selected by their order of placement in the divisions.

Example: if #5, #6 and #7 are all present, #5 and #6 would be selected. If there are not 2 seeds present in Group-B then you check Group-C to complete the total of 4 seeds. The number of needed competitors from Group B and/or Group C if needed are selected by their order of placement in the division. Once the additional seeds are selected they will be shuffled to determine their placement of order.

The Group-B seeds will always be placed in order before the Group-A seeds and Group-C seeds, if needed, will be placed before Group-B Seeds. A maximum of 3 shuffles could be used if all 3 Seed Groups are used. If there are not 4 seeds available using all 3 Seed Groups, you seed less than 4.

It is required that the center official either supervise or perform the random selection process of the seeds. If a competitor arrives late (the division is ready to start, but the 1st competitor has not started), the late entry must compete first, including seeds who arrive late; refer to section 1.06 – Late Entry.

Section 12.07 FIGHT SEEDING The top seeds (Max 4) will be seeded in the first round of competition with all competitors. The Seeds (Max 4) will be seeded away from each other in the brackets with the number one and four seeds in the top bracket and the number 2 and 3 seeds in the bottom bracket.

  1. Section 12.08 SEEDING FAIRNESS RULE
  2. If there are question about seeding that arise that cannot be answered by the rules above, the Chief Tournament Arbitrator will make the final decision who and how a competitor will be seeded.
  3. Section 12.09 UNDER BLACK BELTS NASKA
  4. does not require seeding in the under black belts divisions.

: Rules – NASKA • North American Sport Karate Association

Is Cobra Kai real karate?

What Style of Karate is Cobra Kai? – Cobra Kai Karate is it’s own style derived from Shotokan and Tang Soo Do. It uses lot’s of side kicks, knee kicks, round house kicks, and Sweeps in combination with straight punches, backfists, and chops. Cobra Kai is a derivative of American Tang Soo Do, popularized by Karate Champion Chuck Norris,

  1. Johnny Lawrence (William Zabka ), is basically the new Chuck Norris.
  2. Billy Zabka learned Tang Soo Do from Pat Johnson (the number 1 student of Chuck Norris in the early 80s).
  3. Tang Soo Do means Chinese Fist and is a combination of several fighting arts that were combined and advanced by Korean Masters.

Unlike it’s Japanese Karate Counterpart (hence Miyagi Do Goju Ryu Style) it uses more Korean Based Kicks and Sweeps. Check out some of Johnny’s Original Cobra Kai Moves in this Compilation I found: ‍

Is Cobra Kai even karate?

One of the most popular and iconic movies of all time, the Karate Kid gave us much more than a couple of laughs or goosebumps. Rap songs, sayings, jokes, and more are centered around or at least contain elements from this movie, but there is something else we all were introduced to by the movie: Cobra Kai.

  1. Ever since the movie came out, people have been flocking to train karate, and to their disappointment, none of the actual dojos are like the Cobra Kai training method shown in the movie.
  2. So what style of karate is Cobra Kai? Cobra Kai is a non-traditional, fictional form of fighting made up for the sake of the film, which has elements from traditional Goju-Ryu and Shito-Ryu but doesn’t specifically belong to either of them.

However, it does have some basis in reality. It is not a real, traditional style of fighting, but the movements are actually very real and are parts of different types of karate, merged together to form a style that is palatable and fun to watch. After all, they were going for the cinema experience, and not the dojo experience when making this film.

Is Cobra Kai fake karate?

Cobra Kai is ZERO percent realistic, but very entertaining. The storyline in Cobra Kai has absolutely nothing to do with reality, not even vaguely. Martial Arts clubs don’t go to war with each other or ‘join forces’ like a G.I.

What sport is also an art?

So, the verdict to the debate of dance being an art or sport is that it is both. Just because dance is not classified as a sport in the Olympics doesn’t mean it isn’t one.

Is a sport an art?

Sport is an expression of humanity such as art. It is an expression of human spirit in its many forms.

What is karate in art?

Karate is a Japanese martial art whose physical aspects seek the development of defensive and counterattacking body movements. The themes of traditional karate training are fighting and self-defense, though its mental and moral aspects target the overall improvement of the individual. This is facilitated by the discipline and persistent effort required in training. If karate had to be described in only one sentence, then the most suitable one may arguably be “You never attack first in karate.” This is a a maxim of Gichin Funakoshi (1868-1957), the Okinawan who brought karate to Japan in 1922, and who is accepted as the father of modern karate. The word karate is a combination of two kanji (Chinese characters): kara, meaning empty, and te, meaning hand; thus, karate means “empty hand.” Adding the suffix “-dō” (pronounced “daw”), meaning “the way/path,” karate-dō, implies karate as a total way of life that goes well beyond the self-defense applications. In traditional karate-dō, one is supposed to compete and strive to excel against him/herself. Today there are four main styles of karate in Japan: Shotokan, Goju-ryu, Shito-ryu, and Wado-ryu. Shotokan, though never described as a style by Gichin Funakoshi, it has been nevertheless considered as his. Actually Shotokan was the name of his dōjo, chosen after the pen name used by Funakoshi to sign poems written in his youth. Shotokan Karate is characterized by powerful linear techniques and deep strong stances. It is the style taught at the Tulane Karate Club. Like the word karate, Shotokan is also composed of two different kanji : Shoto, meaning “pine breeze” and kan, meaning “the place”, thus Shotokan means the place of shoto,

Is martial arts a sport or hobby?

Importance Of Martial Arts For many people, martial arts is an integral part of life. People practice martial arts as a sport, a hobby, an artistic expression or a regimen for physical, mental and emotional well-being. Skills learned in the study of martial arts can be applied in other aspects and relationships in life.

  • Self-Defense Majority of those signing up for martial arts have personal safety as their main reason for training.
  • Violence is a reality that is faced by everyone and martial arts training provides necessary skills to increase chances of survival.
  • Students learn and practice risk avoidance and fighting skills that they can apply should their safety be at risk.

Self-confidence Fear and lack of knowledge and skill contribute largely to poor self confidence. Martial arts training provides tools that enable people to learn and apply skills that help them realize not only what they are capable of but also gives them a sense of pride from knowing what they have accomplished.

Fear is reduced from knowing there are skills to draw upon when attacked. As students progress to new levels, challenges are met with less apprehsion and with more drive to perservere and succeed. Overall Health Physical, mental and emotional well-being are the other major reasons why people sign up for martial arts training.

Consistent training not only conditions the mind and body to have strength and stamina to fight back in a violent situation but also helps the body fight disease, stay flexible, strong and active as people age. Martial arts provides stress relief and ways to release pent up energy.

  • Together with a healthy diet martial arts training gives people a well rounded regimen that they can do anytime and anywhere.
  • People take control of their well being by being mindful of and making adjustments to things that they know could affect them.
  • Community Martial arts in itself is a community.
  • While martial arts was first used by people to secretly train together to fight against oppressors, today’s martial arts has become a community with an even bigger purpose.

It’s where people meet and share with others their passions. It’s where you find people of all ages and from all walks of life to learn from and pass on knowledge. It’s where people train hard, celebrate the wins and happy moments and comfort in times of trouble and loss.