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Fitness, Sport, Reizen

Do Or Play Sports?

Do Or Play Sports
Collocations: do, play or go with sports and other activities In British English, you can “do sport”. In American English you can “play sport s “. A typical mistake Spanish speakers make is using the verb practise for sports: *I love practising sport. This should be: I love sport.

I usually practise sport every evening, This should be: I usually do sport every evening, However, in American English you can use the verb practise or practice (as it is spelt there) to mean “to train”: The team is practicing for tomorrow’s competition, When other words related to sports are used, we may use other verbs: “What sports do you do?” “I play tennis”.

Observe these pictures:

Go skiing Do karate Play tennis

There are three verbs that collocate with sports and other free time activities: go, do and play, but they are not interchangeable:

Go is used with activities and sports that end in -ing, The verb go here implies that we go somewhere to practice this sport: go swimming, Do is used with recreational activities and with individual, non-team sports or sports in which a ball is not used, like martial arts, for example: do a crossword puzzle, do athletics, do karate, Play is generally used with team sports and those sports that need a ball or similar object (puck, disc, shuttlecock.). Also, those activities in which two people or teams compete against each other: play football, play poker, play chess,

In this table there is a list of sports and activities that collocate with these verbs:

Go Do Play
riding aerobics badminton
jogging gymnastics table-tennis
hitch-hiking taekwondo football
fishing judo basketball
sailing karate chess
windsurfing kung-fu cricket
skiing ballet board games
snowboarding exercise snooker
swimming yoga hockey
dancing athletics baseball
skating archery rugby
cycling a crossword puzzle volleyball
running tai chi squash

Some exceptions to the rules:

You use do with three activities that end in -ing : do boxing, do body-building and do weight-lifting because they don’t imply moving along as the other activities ending in -ing, Golf: if there is an idea of competition, you use the verb play, However, you can say go golfing if you do it for pleasure: Tiger Woods plays golf. We’ll go golfing at the weekend.

Tiger Woods

Now try doing these exercises: : Collocations: do, play or go with sports and other activities

Is it doing or playing sports?

Sports verbs: when to use play, go or do What is your favourite sport ? Tennis, sailing, karate? Do you know which verb you should use with it? Not sure? Fear not, the answer lies on this very page! There are 3 verbs in English that you can use to say what sport you do: play, go and do You already know that we play games.

So for any sport that is a game, use the verb to play : You can play tennis, football, badminton, basketball, squash, hockey, and so on. If the name of the sport is an activity based on a verb and ends in –ing, then use the verb to go : You can go running, swimming, cycling, climbing, and so on. For any other sport, as for the word sport itself, use the verb to do : You can do sport, karate, yoga, athletics, ballet, and so on.

Careful! There are exceptions for activities ending in –ing where you need the verb do instead of the verb go : You do fencing, boxing, body-building, weight-lifting. Why? It is a question of space ! If you think about the space you need for boxing, fencing, body-building or weight-lifting, you can see it is very limited compared with activities such as swimming, sailing, cycling etc.

  1. Some prefer not to use do with sports like boxing or wrestling.
  2. They will say I box, I wrestle.
  3. There you are! Now you know whether to use play, go or do for all the sports you do or dream of giving a try.
  4. Congratulations! ? Do you want some practice? Try this activity: enter the correct verb for each sport.

And enjoy yourself! ? : Sports verbs: when to use play, go or do

Do you do sport or do you play sport?

Do, Play or Go with Various Sports Do Do is used for a recreational activity or a non-team sport that does not use a ball:

All classes do gymnastics at school. Sophie does yoga with a group of friends.

Play Play is used with ball sports or competitive games where we play against another person:

Two people can play a game of tennis. You need a team to play football.

Go Go is used with activities that end -ing. We go somewhere to do something:

To camp → go camping We often go camping in the summer. To swim → go swimming Many children like to go swimming.

Do Or Play Sports In British English, you can “do sport”. In American English you can “play sports”. A typical mistake Spanish speakers make is using the verb practise for sports: I love practising sport. This should be: I love sport. I usually practise sport every evening.

What is the difference between do sport and play sport?

Do sport = UK play sports = US You saw ‘do sport’ in an IELTS book, which uses UK English, and you saw ‘play sports’ in an American learner’s dictionary site from Merriam-Webster.

Which verb to use with sport?

A common topic of conversation is the sports people enjoy playing and watching – so it’s important to know which verb to use! When we discuss sport there are three verbs that we use: play, go and do, For example: “I play table-tennis.” “I go fishing. ” “I do yoga.” Choose the correct verb for each sport: Lesson by Amanda Pooley, EC Cape Town English language school

1 – Golf: 2 – Skiing: 3 – Karate: 4 – Cycling: 5 – Tennis: 6 – Judo: 7 – Running: 8 – Swimming: 9 – Cricket: 10 – Badminton: 11 – Ballet: 12 – Snowboarding: 13 – Diving:

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Do you do or play golf?

Play – Play is used with sports that have teams, rules and competitions: Badminton, baseball, football, golf, rugby and tennis are some examples. I have been playing tennis for over ten years. When I was young we played football just outside our house in the street.

Do you play or do chess?

And for all games, we we use ‘do’. like chess or card or games alike, we can say ‘let’s play another round’ or ‘let’s do another round’.

How often do you play sport or do exercise?

Health: Sports Recommendations Per Week Or Per Day – Officially, organizations like the WHO estimate at least 150 minutes of moderate physical activity should be done per week. This means doing sports for around 20 to 25 minutes per day. On what concerns sports and physical activity, the United States Department of Health and Human Services recommends that adults:

Do at least 150 minutes to 300 minutes a week of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity;Do instead 75 minutes to 150 minutes a week of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity;Engage in physical activity beyond 300 minutes to gain additional health benefits;Do muscle-strengthening activities of moderate or greater intensity and that involve all major muscle groups on 2 or more days a week.

What is play sport?

PlaySport – PlaySport is an online activity-based resource which was initially developed by Ophea in partnership with Brock University in 2002. In 2014, with the help of funding from the Government of Ontario, the resource was enhanced and relaunched in English and French.

  • The enhanced resource contains linkages to the Health and Physical Education curriculum and the TORONTO 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games.
  • PlaySport helps children and youth develop an understanding of and competency with skills and strategies associated with physical activities and a wide range of sports.

The activities in PlaySport can provide experiences for participants to help them build physical literacy, health literacy and the skills for healthy active living. Designed for educators, recreation providers, coaches and physical activity promoters, PlaySport uses the Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU) approach.

A searchable database of downloadable activity cards with step-by-step instructions Access to animations and/or illustrations for each activity Linkages within each activity to the Ontario Health and Physical Education (H&PE) Curriculum Connections within each activity to the Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines Athlete videos which highlight some of Canada’s top athletes and the connection between physical activity and the development of living skills

What is the meaning of do sport?

A game, competition, or activity needing physical effort and skill that is played or done according to rules, for enjoyment and/or as a job : Football, basketball, and hockey are all team sports.

What does it mean to play a sport?

The 2005 London Marathon : running races, in their various specialties, represent the oldest and most traditional form of sport. Sport pertains to any form of physical activity or game, often competitive and organised, that aims to use, maintain, or improve physical ability and skills while providing enjoyment to participants and, in some cases, entertainment to spectators.

Sports can, through casual or organised participation, improve participants’ physical health. Hundreds of sports exist, from those between single contestants, through to those with hundreds of simultaneous participants, either in teams or competing as individuals. In certain sports such as racing, many contestants may compete, simultaneously or consecutively, with one winner; in others, the contest (a match ) is between two sides, each attempting to exceed the other.

Some sports allow a “tie” or “draw”, in which there is no single winner; others provide tie-breaking methods to ensure one winner and one loser. A number of contests may be arranged in a tournament producing a champion, Many sports leagues make an annual champion by arranging games in a regular sports season, followed in some cases by playoffs,

  1. Sport is generally recognised as system of activities based in physical athleticism or physical dexterity, with major competitions such as the Olympic Games admitting only sports meeting this definition.
  2. Other organisations, such as the Council of Europe, preclude activities without a physical element from classification as sports.

However, a number of competitive, but non-physical, activities claim recognition as mind sports, The International Olympic Committee (through ARISF ) recognises both chess and bridge as bona fide sports, and SportAccord, the international sports federation association, recognises five non-physical sports: bridge, chess, draughts (checkers), Go and xiangqi, and limits the number of mind games which can be admitted as sports.

Sport is usually governed by a set of rules or customs, which serve to ensure fair competition, and allow consistent adjudication of the winner. Winning can be determined by physical events such as scoring goals or crossing a line first. It can also be determined by judges who are scoring elements of the sporting performance, including objective or subjective measures such as technical performance or artistic impression.

Records of performance are often kept, and for popular sports, this information may be widely announced or reported in sport news, Sport is also a major source of entertainment for non-participants, with spectator sport drawing large crowds to sport venues, and reaching wider audiences through broadcasting,

See also:  Can You Play Sports After Getting A Tattoo?

How do you use play sport in a sentence?

The youngsters play sport and learn about life. Use it before playing sport or going to the gym. We’re also not allowed to play competitive sport.

Do we use the before sports?

Using English Articles (#13) _ When Not to Use Articles (#2)

Here are more situations in which no articles are used:

1. In general, do not use articles before names of divinities :

not this: but this: *He believes in the God. He believes in God.
not this: but this: *The Hawai’ian goddess of fire is named the Pele. The Hawai’ian goddess of fire is named Pele.

/td>

2. Do not use articles before the names of academic (school) subjects:

not this: but this: *John is majoring in the Biology. John is majoring in Biology.
not this: but this: *Ruth has a Master’s degree in the C.I.S. (Computer Information Systems). Ruth has a Master’s degree in C.I.S. (Computer Information Systems).

/td> 3. Do not use articles before the names of sports :

not this: but this: *The boxing is a violent sport. Boxing is a violent sport.
not this: but this: *The hurling is an unusual sport which is played on ice. Hurling is an unusual sport which is played on ice.

/td> 4. Do not use articles before the names of holidays :

not this: but this: *The Christmas is an important family holiday. Christmas is an important family holiday.
not this: but this: *In the U.S., the Independence Day is celebrated on July 4th. In the U.S., Independence Day is celebrated on July 4th.

/td> 5. Do not use articles before abstract nouns :

not this: but this: *The patience is a quality which he greatly admires. Patience is a quality which he greatly admires.
not this: but this: *The knowledge and the wisdom are two very different things. Knowledge and wisdom are two very different things.
not this: but this: *Is it possible to have both the self-confidence and the humility at the same time? Is it possible to have both self-confidence and humility at the same time?

/td>

_ Special Notes:

1. Look at this sentence: “The Hawai’ian goddess of fire is named Pele.” In this sentence, goddess is a general noun, but Hawai’ian and of fire make goddess specific. For that reason, goddess needs an article. The is used because there is only one Hawai’ian goddess of fire. Pele is, however, a name. For that reason, no article is used.
2. Look at this sentence: “Ruth has a Master’s degree in C.I.S. (Computer Information Systems).” In this sentence, degree is a general noun; Master’s tells what kind. Because degree is general, an article is needed. Because there are many different Master’s degrees and because “Master’s” begins with a consonant sound, a is used.C.I.S. (Computer Information Systems) is, however, a name. For that reason, no article is used.
3. Compare these two sentences: “In the U.S., Independence Day is celebrated on July 4th.” “In the U.S., Independence Day is celebrated on the 4th of July.” Do you understand why the is used before “U.S.”? Do you understand why the is not used with “July 4th,”, but is used with “4th of July”?

/td>

Is it make or do exercises?

Do we make exercise or do exercise? Do we make a decision or do a decision? Do we make research or do research? In general, we use ‘make’ in situations where we are creating, producing or building something OR when we are planning.

Do you play or do bowling?

Play Go Do video transcript – What do you want to do this weekend? We could go to the gym and do some weight lifting. Urgh! That’s too energetic. Or we could play some golf. No, let’s go bowling. Bowling? Yeah. But you always win. That’s why I like it. We use these verbs to talk about sports in English.

So we do weight lifting. We play golf. And we go bowling. I play golf. In this video you’ll learn which verbs we use with which sports. And you’ll learn the names of lots of sports. Let’s start with the verb ‘play’. In America, we play football. That’s American football, Jay. The rest of the world plays football like this.

No, we call that soccer. In British English it’s football. But the ball’s the wrong shape for football. If it’s a sport with a ball, we generally play it. There are exceptions, like we go bowling. But usually we play ball sports. So we play cricket. We play tennis.

  • We play snooker and we play pool.
  • We often use ‘play’ where there’s a competition, so someone wins or loses.
  • And of course we can play other games like cards and chess.
  • So we play darts, and we play scrabble.
  • OK, let’s move on to the verb ‘go’. Oooo.
  • What’s the matter? I went jogging this morning and I hurt my back.

You poor thing! Notice Jay said ‘went jogging’. ‘Went’ is the past tense of ‘go’ and ‘jogging’ is a gerund – a noun made from a verb by adding ‘-ing’. There are lots of sports that follow this pattern, and they’re generally activities that we don’t do at home.

We go out to another place to do them. So we go swimming, we go fishing, we go skiing, we go surfing and we go skateboarding. I’m playing golf tonight. I love golf. What’s your favorite sport, Vicki? Gymnastics. But you don’t do gymnastics. No, I just like watching it on TV. So do I. Our last verb is ‘do’ and we use it with newer more modern sports.

We ‘practice’ or ‘do’ them. So we do yoga, do aerobics, do pilates, do judo and do kendo and other martial arts. We also use ‘do’ to talk about specific exercises. So we do squats and we do leg lifts. I do this exercise to build my chest and arm muscles.

  1. OK, now it’s your turn.
  2. You’re going to see some different sports, games and exercises.
  3. Can you say which verb we use with them? Did you get them all? Let’s review.
  4. Go horse riding.
  5. Play basketball.
  6. Do push ups.
  7. Go sailing.
  8. Play baseball.
  9. Go cycling.
  10. Do parkour.
  11. Play rugby.
  12. Go paragliding.
  13. Play shuffleboard.
  14. Do karate.

Go rafting. Go rock climbing. Play volleyball. Go ballooning. Do tai chi. Play rock paper scissors. So are we playing golf or are we going bowling? We’re going bowling. Hmmm. I know. We’ll play rock paper scissors and the winner chooses. So if I win, we’ll play golf.

Which preposition is used with sports?

Because ‘sports’ is a plural count noun, of is the correct preposition to use.

What is the difference between play and do?

Collocations: do, play or go with sports and other activities In British English, you can “do sport”. In American English you can “play sport s “. A typical mistake Spanish speakers make is using the verb practise for sports: *I love practising sport. This should be: I love sport.

*I usually practise sport every evening, This should be: I usually do sport every evening, However, in American English you can use the verb practise or practice (as it is spelt there) to mean “to train”: The team is practicing for tomorrow’s competition, When other words related to sports are used, we may use other verbs: “What sports do you do?” “I play tennis”.

Observe these pictures:

Go skiing Do karate Play tennis

There are three verbs that collocate with sports and other free time activities: go, do and play, but they are not interchangeable:

Go is used with activities and sports that end in -ing, The verb go here implies that we go somewhere to practice this sport: go swimming, Do is used with recreational activities and with individual, non-team sports or sports in which a ball is not used, like martial arts, for example: do a crossword puzzle, do athletics, do karate, Play is generally used with team sports and those sports that need a ball or similar object (puck, disc, shuttlecock.). Also, those activities in which two people or teams compete against each other: play football, play poker, play chess,

In this table there is a list of sports and activities that collocate with these verbs:

Go Do Play
riding aerobics badminton
jogging gymnastics table-tennis
hitch-hiking taekwondo football
fishing judo basketball
sailing karate chess
windsurfing kung-fu cricket
skiing ballet board games
snowboarding exercise snooker
swimming yoga hockey
dancing athletics baseball
skating archery rugby
cycling a crossword puzzle volleyball
running tai chi squash

Some exceptions to the rules:

You use do with three activities that end in -ing : do boxing, do body-building and do weight-lifting because they don’t imply moving along as the other activities ending in -ing, Golf: if there is an idea of competition, you use the verb play, However, you can say go golfing if you do it for pleasure: Tiger Woods plays golf. We’ll go golfing at the weekend.

Tiger Woods

Now try doing these exercises: : Collocations: do, play or go with sports and other activities

Why do people do sport?

Role of Sports in the Development of an Individual and Role of Psychology in Sports ** Professor and Head, Department of Psychiatry, MGM Medical College, Sector-1, Kamothe, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Find articles by

  • ** Professor and Head, Department of Psychiatry, MGM Medical College, Sector-1, Kamothe, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  • Address for correspondence: Dr Rakesh Ghildiyal, 103/104, Shanti Sadan, Plot 39, Sector-15, Vashi, Navi Mumbai – 400 703, Maharashtra, India. E-mail:
  • * Revised, updated version of the BPS Presidential Address delivered on 24 April 2011.

Received 2014 Dec 16; Revised 2015 Feb 26; Accepted 2015 Feb 27. : © Mens Sana Monographs This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Sports helps an individual much more than in the physical aspects alone. It builds character, teaches and develops strategic thinking, analytical thinking, leadership skills, goal setting and risk taking, just to name a few. Keywords: Analytical thinking, Goal setting, Leadership skills, Presidential Address, Psychology, Risk taking, Sports, Strategic thinking Today, I am going to speak on psychology and sports.

By sports my reference is not on creating champions but as a means to developing a:

  1. Sporting attitude/spirit.
  2. Positive attitude towards life and its struggles.
  3. Shaping one’s personality and character.

We are all well aware of the fact that participating in sports/physical activity develops the five components of fitness, namely: strength, speed, skill, stamina and flexibility. We all remember April 2 nd 2011, here in Mumbai, when we won the Cricket World Cup.

  • On my way back from the Wankhede Stadium, there were wild celebrations all over Mumbai, across the streets all the way up to Vashi, Navi Mumbai; and I am sure the celebrations were equally ecstatic across the country.
  • Unifying all, across lines of age, religion, caste, socio-economic status, educational qualifications, position held in society.

Well, that is the effect of sports. ‘Healthy Mind In a healthy Body’, and ‘Healthy Body in a Healthy Mind’. Both these statements are 100% true.

  • Sports is exercise/physical activity with fun, ‘ masti ‘.
  • Sports is exercise/physical activity with an objective and definite aim.
  • Sports is exercise/physical activity with a purpose to overcome adversities and win.
  • Playing sports helps release pressure and tension in a healthy and controlled way.
  • Sports improves sleep patterns and levels of anxiety.
  • Sports develops motor skills and mind/body connection.
  • Sports staves off depression.
  • Sports reduces the risk of many physical diseases.

I will divide my further talk into two parts:

  1. Sports in psychology and life.
  2. Psychology in sports.

Sports is a learning experience. Of all who take up sports only one may eventually become a champion, but definitely all will be winners. Sports has helped me and the principles of sports continue to help me through difficult times. Sports help students study better, improves concentration, problem solving, memory. Sports teaches one to develop the following:

  1. Team spirit: Working towards a common goal as a member of a team, selflessly, personal interests notwithstanding.
  2. Leadership skills: Lead different people from all walks of life towards a common goal/objective. A good leader is one who leads others on to leadership.
  3. Fairplay: Though winning is important, losing is not a disgrace. Being generous and graceful in victory as well as defeat. Have respect for the vanquished.
  4. Never give up: Sports teaches you to never give up. ‘Success is just round the bend’, being persistent, nothing is impossible. You never know how close you are to success when you give up.
  5. Great leveller: Sport is a great leveller – you lose 1-day only to bounce back the next. No loss is permanent. Even a loss teaches you how not to do something, or how it could be done better. No setback is permanent, never should one lose hope.
  6. Focus: Sport teaches you to focus on the present. Past is irrelevant, and future, who knows?
  7. Strengths and abilities: Sport teaches you to focus on your strengths and abilities, not on your opponents’ strengths and capabilities.
  8. Process and result: Sport teaches you that the process is more important than the result. If the process is right, success will soon ensue. According to Basketball Coach John Wooden:
    • Success is peace of mind, which is a direct result of self-satisfaction in knowing you did your best to become the best that you are capable of becoming.
  9. Planning: Sport teaches you to plan ahead, see through the consequences of your act. You need to quickly assess the situation, adjust, adapt and act accordingly. Being flexible and not carry a fixed mindset.
  10. Earnestness and sincerity: Sport teaches you not to take any situation lightly or display casualness, and that every situation should be handled with earnestness and sincerity.
  11. Observation and analysis: Sports improves your observatory powers and analytical skills.

Now, to the second half of my talk. This section includes important aspects of psychology in sports which I shall present as points:

  1. Positive attitude: It is often said a game is won or lost in the locker room before the start of the match. Having a positive attitude goes a long way in determining the eventual outcome of the game between closely matched participants.
  2. Respect for the opponent is necessary but do not let this overwhelm you. Respecting their abilities, giving your best always, and no casualness in approach even when comfortably placed. Remember on a given day anything and everything is possible.
  3. ‘Killer instinct’ is necessary at all times (within the framework of fairplay). By this, you are giving due respect to your opponent and acknowledging the fact that he/she is as good as you, and the slightest slackness shown by you will allow your opponent to claw back and the outcome of the game may easily be reversed.
  4. Never give up attitude: As mentioned in section above, however hopeless the situation may seem, success is just around the corner. No match is won till the last ball is bowled. Play to your strength, give it your best, enjoy the game, you have nothing to lose. Loss is not the end, there is no shame, disrespect, humiliation, provided you have given your best.
  5. Fear of losing will increase your anxiety and cause distress and hence leading to poor performance and undesirable results.
  6. Use stress as a motivating factor to raise your performance to optimum levels especially in crucial/crunch games.
  7. Never bother about consequences, give it your best shot always, enjoy the game.
  8. Always have a positive body language.

Playing sports or engaging in extracurricular activities play an important part in one’s character/personality development. One develops management skills, negotiation skills, communication skills, convincing skills, conflict management and confidence.

  1. Sports in psychology and life helps develop team spirit, leadership skills, fairplay, never give up attitude and focus. It is a great leveller, helps us know our strengths and abilities, understand process and result, the value of planning, earnestness and sincerity, observation and analysis.
  2. Psychology in sports helps develop a positive attitude, respect for the opponent, killer instinct, and a never give up attitude. Fear of losing adds to stress while stress should be used as a motivating factor. Sports help develop the attitude of never being unduly bothered about consequences; it also helps develop a positive body language.
  1. Take up to a sport now; it is never too late.
  2. Always have a sporting attitude.
  3. Sports/physical activities are a way of life.
  4. Healthy mind in a healthy body.
  1. Does sports eat away into study time?
  2. Is it true that you can either be a sportsman or a scholar?
  3. Sports exercises only your body, not your mind. Is this so?
  4. Does sports shape personality/character?

Rakesh Ghildiyal MD is presently Professor and Head, Department of Psychiatry, MGM Medical College, Navi Mumbai, since 2001. He is also Consultant Psychiatrist, MGM’s New Bombay Hospital, Vashi and a Consultant Psychiatrist in private practice at Vashi, Navi Mumbai since the past 25 years.

He is a Postgraduate (MD) teacher in Psychiatry and a PhD guide. He is a keen sportsman having represented his College in Badminton and Football and won the All India Inter-Medical Badminton Championship in 1980. A keen trekker (high altitude), he has done Everest Base Camp (Gorakhshep and Kaala Patther-approx.18,500 feet) in 1992.

I humbly acknowledge my parents, my teachers, my mentors, my guide, and last but not the least my wife and my son.

  1. Conflict of interest
  2. None declared.
  3. Declaration
  4. This is my original unpublished article, not submitted for publication elsewhere.

CITATION: Ghildiyal R. Role of sports in the development of an individual and role of psychology in sports. Mens Sana Monogr 2015;13:165-170. Peer reviewer for this paper: Anon Articles from Mens Sana Monographs are provided here courtesy of Wolters Kluwer – Medknow Publications : Role of Sports in the Development of an Individual and Role of Psychology in Sports

Why do I love to play sports?

Why we L-O-V-E sports today and everyday! | Kids In The Game Valentine’s Day is the time to reflect on all the things we love in life. At Kids in the Game, our love for sports is pretty darn high on that list. Between,, and, we feel super lucky to be immersed in sports on a daily basis.

  • To celebrate today’s day of love we wanted to share some stories of why our coaches love sports not only today but everyday.
  • Michael Murphy- Co-Founder Why do I love sports? Let me count the ways.I love sports for all the amazing doors they have opened for me in my life.
  • Playing sports have allowed me to travel the World, make new friends and experience new cultures.

I have run a road race in Sweden. Played basketball in Fiji and Australia. Coached basketball in Belgium, France and The Netherlands. Played soccer with kids in Denmark. And most recently experienced shooting hoops while wearing flip-flops in The Philippines.

  1. All of this because of a bouncing ball and a desire to have fun playing the sports I love.
  2. I love sports for everything they have taught me about teamwork, leadership, community, hard work, the pursuit of excellence and achieving goals.
  3. All of these positive skills helped me to make sports not only a passion, but a career.

My career in sports is not a job, it is a passion. I love to coach, teach and inspire student-athletes around the World. Sports inspire all of us to do great things. All while cheering positively for our favorite teams. All while having fun in a safe environment.

I love sports. They are a true love of mine. Matt Murphy- Kids in the Game Co-Founder Sports taught me work ethic, goal setting, leadership, teamwork, and how to handle things when they don’t go your way. Sports taught me how to be humble, as I went through periods where I was a starter, scoring points, and winning games and times where I sat on the bench, played terrible, or lost a heartbreaker.

Why is that important? Because those are all lessons you need to develop in life to be successful. Life isn’t easy! On top of that, sports naturally develop deep relationships. A majority of my best friends, even today, are those I grew up with playing sports in elementary, high school, or college.

That’s why watching our King Kids play sports is so inspiring for me – I know they’ll keep learning those lessons through sport and developing friendships that last forever. Tatum Boehnke- KING Staff Not to sound pessimistic but the world’s reality is often a far cry from always wearing rose colored glasses.

However, there is this one thing that no matter what seems to bring people of all ages, all races, all genders, and all different backgrounds together: sports. Everyone can identify with that anxiety, that excitement, that pit in their stomach when going for it on 4th and 1.

  • Cities can rebuild their identity with one swing of the bat.
  • Nations can unite and inspire the world in just two weeks.
  • We can all rally behind that unranked tennis player taking the world’s #1 to a 5th set.That is what I love about sports.
  • I love that the reach of sport is far beyond the basics of a win/loss column.

Fan bases become families and everyone can just agree that summer nights are for baseball, March is for basketball and no one should have to work the day after the Superbowl. Paul O’Connor- Director of I think what I love most about sports is getting a group of individuals to come together as a team.

Instilling the confidence in young kids and then being able to watch them do what they thought they would never be able to is the best feeling. Cara Hudson- Program Coordinator and I love sports because they teach everyone about sportsmanship and how to work as a team. These are two very important things to learn throughout life to help people grow into strong and respectful human beings.

I love that sports bring people together for all over the world. Sheryl Katz- Director of Marketing Movement has always been a major part of my life from gymnastics to playing soccer (being slightly scared of the ball still counts, right?) to dancing.

  1. My passion for all-things music combined with my intent to express a feeling through movement makes dancing my ideal outlet.
  2. It’s during this time that I can let all of myself go and live in the moment.
  3. Every time I do, I leave feeling stronger – mentally and physically.Dancing requires us to focus on controlling all parts of our bodies while thinking about applying the emotion we’re meant to exude.

The combination of sport and art evolves into a multi-faceted pastime. Bonus: I’ve discovered some of my favorite songs while watching dance performances! Katherine Higuera-McCoy- Sr. Program Coordinator and Director Ok, what do I love about sports? To be honest, the competition and training.

I love watching athletes compete and do the best they can to excel in their particular sport. As a former college athlete myself, I know what it takes to push your body to the limit. I respect and admire others in every sport for pushing and testing their bodies to the fullest capacity. I love seeing the drive in people and the want/urge to win, or in some cases just trying their best.

Working with KING just further pushes my love for sports as we get to see the beginning of prospective athletes. We get to train the future and teach them what we know and love about sports. Our staff really makes it great for each child to excel and learn a new passion at such an early age.

I love sharing my expertise in volleyball to the student athletes I coach because I am passing on everything I know to them. Plus, as an added bonus I get to learn new skills from other former collegiate athletes and get to continuously push myself to new limits. Frances Niduaza-Murphy- Director of Performing Arts Even though my training is in classical music (finished my doctoral studies in Collaborative Piano), I have always loved sports, fitness, and the great outdoors.

I was a volleyball player from grade school until my senior year in high school, not to mention being actively involved as a church pianist and choir member. Also, I’m still brushing up on my swimming skills. Music and sports have a lot in common: they both teach and enable one to study, to listen, to manage time, to organize, to resolve conflict, to manage stress, to collaborate (being a team player), and to be willing to learn.

Adam Garrison- KING Staff I love sports because it has provided me the foundation for the development of many lifelong friendships. Sports can also provide a link between generations and strengthen family relationships. Ramsey Freeman- KING Coach Working with kids has always been so rewarding. With KING, there are countless opportunities to make an impact on the children that we work and play with.

I love the chance to make the kids happy. Seeing them smile and making them laugh is a great perk to the job! : Why we L-O-V-E sports today and everyday! | Kids In The Game

Why do people play or watch sports?

Why Do People Enjoy Watching Sports? Mar 14, 2023 Do Or Play Sports Watching sports is an activity that brings people together and allows them to share in the joys of the competition. People enjoy watching sports because it provides them with an outlet to de-stress and have some entertainment. For some people, watching sports can even provide some form of catharsis.

More often than not, as people come together to watch their favorite teams play, they also engage in passionate discussions about what they know from expert picks like the, predictions, and news about their particular sport. This fosters great social interaction among families, friends and neighbors who share interest in the same sport.

With that in mind, let’s have a look further into why people enjoy watching sports so much. Understanding the social aspect of sports fanship Sports fanship is a complex phenomenon that involves more than just the love of a particular team or sport. It also involves the social aspect of being a fan, which includes understanding how to interact with other fans and how to show support for your favorite team.

To make sense of this social aspect, it’s important to look at the different types of fanship. There are those who are die-hard supporters, who will go out of their way to attend games and cheer on their team no matter what. Then, there are those who may not be as passionate but still enjoy watching games and talking about them with friends.

Then there is a third group who simply like to watch sports for entertainment without any real emotional attachment. Each type of fan has its own unique set of behaviors and attitudes toward their favorite teams or sport, but in most cases, being a fan isn’t just about cheering on your team.

In fact, it’s also about connecting with other people who share your passion for sports and forming meaningful relationships with them. The psychological benefits of watching sports Watching sports can have a positive psychological effect on people. It can help reduce stress and anxiety, as well as provide an outlet for emotions such as anger or frustration.

Watching sports can also be a great way to bond with friends and family, creating shared experiences that bring people closer together. Moreover, it can also provide a sense of accomplishment when your team wins or you correctly predict the outcome of a game.

This feeling of success can boost self-esteem and confidence in one’s own abilities. And because watching sports is associated with the feelings of joy and excitement, it can only be beneficial for mental health. There is a sense of community in watching sporting events together Watching sporting events as a group is a great way to create a sense of community.

When people come together to watch their favorite teams play, they often form strong bonds with one another. This sense of community can be seen in the cheering and chanting that takes place during games, as well as in the conversations that take place before and after the event.

  1. This sense of community is also evident in the shared excitement when a team wins or the collective disappointment when they lose.
  2. Spectators are able to connect with each other through their shared love for a particular sport or team, creating an atmosphere of camaraderie and support, even though they may not know each other well or at all.

This sense of community is further strengthened by the fact that spectators are often from different backgrounds and walks of life, yet they still find common ground through their passion for sports. Overall, people enjoy watching sports because it provides a sense of entertainment, competition and camaraderie.

What is the meaning of doing sports?

A game, competition, or activity needing physical effort and skill that is played or done according to rules, for enjoyment and/or as a job : Football, basketball, and hockey are all team sports. I enjoy winter sports like skiing and skating. A1 UK.

Is it correct to say playing?

Both ‘play’ and ‘playing’ is correct here. People often see him (who is) playing basketball on the playground at the weekend.

What is the meaning of playing sports?

A human activity involving physical exertion and skill as the primary focus of the activity, with elements of competition or social participation where rules and patterns of behaviour governing the activity exist formally through organisations and is generally recognised as a sport.

What does doing it for sport mean?

Idiom. : for enjoyment and not as a job or for food needed for survival.